9th International Symposium on
Biogeochemistry of Wetlands


March 20-23, 2005

Cook Conference Center & Hotel at LSU

Baton Rouge, LA, USA

              Sponsors:


- Louisiana State University, Wetlands Biogeochemistry Institute
- School of the Coast
& Environment


- Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory
- Soil and Water Science Department


 

Site Index
l Introduction l Program Agenda l Location & Accommodations
l Symposium Structure l Symposium Social Events l Related Sites of Interest
l Program Topics l Organize a Session l Area Information
l Who Should Attend? l Registration Information l Travel Information
l Sponsor Appreciation l For Additional Information
l STUDENT AID APPLICATION l PRESENTER PREPARATION INFORMATION:
(PDF format | MS Word format)

Introduction

The objective of this international symposium is to provide a framework for scientists to share technical information on various topics related to biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and other contaminants, as related soil, water, and air quality in freshwater and estuarine wetlands.

Wetland soils serve as sinks, sources, and transformers of nutrients and other chemical contaminants, and as such they can have a significant impact on water quality and ecosystem productivity. The primary driver of these processes is the ecosystem biogeochemistry, which includes chemical, biological and physical processes in the soil and water column. Often, these processes are lumped and the ecosystem is treated as a "black box" and a simplified input-output analysis is used to address water quality issues. This traditional empirical approach is inadequate for effective evaluation of an ecosystem's performance. Biogeochemistry is an interdisciplinary science, which includes the study of interactive biological, geological and chemical processes regulating the fate and transport of nutrients and contaminants in soil, water and atmospheric components of an ecosystem. Biogeochemistry also provides a framework to integrate physical, chemical and biological processes functioning in an ecosystem at various spatial and temporal scales.

Return to Index


Symposium Structure

Oral sessions will be held in the Cook Conference Center from Monday morning to Wednesday at noon.  There is a plenary session in the Laborde Hall each morning, followed by concurrent sessions during the day.  Poster sessions will be held from 5-7 pm on Monday and Tuesday, but in two different locations.  On Monday evening starting at 5 pm, WBI will host the poster session and reception in the Energy, Coast and Environment Building as part of a dedication of a memorial to Dr. William H. Patrick, Jr.  Directions and specific information on this poster session is described below.  On Tuesday evening starting at 5 pm, the poster session will be held in the Abell Hall of the Cook Conference Center, followed by the banquet in Laborde Hall.  

Plenary Session: The 9th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands will begin with a plenary session each morning, from Monday to Wednesday. On Monday, 21 March, the symposium will begin in a plenary session at 8:00 a.m. in Laborde Hall of the Cook Conference Center.  The Plenary will include a short welcome from the Symposium co-chairs, a welcome from Dr. William Jenkins, President of the LSU System, followed by a series of presentations in honor of the late Dr. William Patrick.  On Tuesday and Wednesday, the plenary sessions will begin at 8:30 am in the Laborde Hall of the Cook Conference Center.  See the program for description of the plenary presentations.

Oral Presentations: Oral Sessions of the 9th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands include blocks of five 20-minute presentations in different arrangements of concurrent sessions.  See the program agenda below for the schedule of oral presentations. During most of the symposium, there are two concurrent sessions held in Laborde and Abell Halls of the Cook Conference Center.  During one section of the program there is a third concurrent session in the Cook Conference Room.  This time schedule of the symposium will be strictly adhered to by the session chairs and is designed for a fifteen-minute presentation leaving ample time for follow-up
questions and discussions and speaker change--over.

Monday Poster Session: The Monday poster session will be held at the School of the Coast and Environment (Energy, Coast and Environment Building) in the Rotunda Conference Room & Auditorium from 5 to 7 pm.  A tour of the Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute’s facilities, located in the School of the Coast and Environment building, will be given during the Monday Reception.

Tuesday Poster Session:  Tuesday poster session will be held in the ABELL Conference Room of the Cook Conference Center from 5 to 7 pm.  Following the poster session will be the Symposium Banquet in the Laborde Hall of the Cook Conference Center. 

Return to Index


Program Topics
  • Wetland community types and functions and values

    • Freshwater wetlands

    • Coastal wetlands

  • Coupled biogeochemical cycles in wetlands

  • Molecular tools to evaluate biogeochemical processes

  • Linkages between biogeochemical processes and biotic communities

  • Role of wetlands in improving water quality

  • Long-term nutrient and organic matter accretion in wetlands

  • Nitrogen processing capacity of wetlands

  • Phosphorus assimilation capacity of wetlands

  • Sulfur cycle importance in coastal marshes

  • Toxic metal biogeochemistry in wetlands

  • Fate of toxic organic compounds

  • Biogeochemical indicators for wetland assessment

  • Stochastic and mechanistic modeling of biogeochemical processes

  • Geospatial and multivariate methods to evaluate biogeochemical processes

  • Constructed wetlands

Return to Index


Who Should Attend?

Participants should be interested in or actively involved in wetland management, water quality, restoration, and constructed wetlands. Those employed in the following occupations would greatly benefit by participating in this international symposium:

  • Biologists

  • City and County Government Officials
    and Decision–Makers

  • Consultants

  • Ecologists

  • Educators

  • Environmental Consultants

  • Environmental Engineers

  • Environmental Health Officials

  • Environmental Regulators

  • Environmental Scientists

  • Foresters

  • Geotechnical Engineers

  • Graduate students

  • Land Use Planners

  • Plant Scientists

  • Soil Scientists

  • Soil Surveyors

  • Water Scientists

  • Wetland Delineators

·Return to Index


Program Agenda

Sunday, March 20, 2005

4:00pm-8:00pm

Registration – Lobby of Cook Conference Center

5:00pm-7:00pm

Poster set-up – Anderson Conference Room of Cook Conference Center

6:00pm-8:00pm

Welcome & Co-Chair Reception (Sponsored by BP)

 Monday, March 21, 2005

7:30am-5:00pm

Registration – Lobby of Cook Conference Center

Plenary Session I - Laborde Hall, Cook Conference Center

Session Chair: Robert Twilley

8:00am-8:15am

Symposium Opening & Welcome – Robert Twilley, Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University

8:15am-8:30am

Welcome to Louisiana State University – William Jenkins, President of the LSU System

8:30am-8:55am

Biogeochemistry of Wetland Soils: A Review of Five Decades of Research – K. R. Reddy1 and R. D. Delaune2; 1Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory; Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 2Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

8:55am-9:20am

Phosphorus, Patrick and Polemics – Curtis J. Richardson; Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Durham, NC

9:20am-9:50am

Greenhouse Gases and Experiences with Bill Patrick – O. Van Cleemput and P. Boeckx; Laboratory of Applied Physical chemistry (ISOFYS), Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Belgium

9:50am-10:20am

BREAK

Session B1: Treatment of Agricultural Runoff in Constructed and NaturalWetlands - Laborde Hall

Session Chair: John R. White

10:20am-10:40am

Strategic Restoration of Wetlands on Private Lands: Regional Approaches in the Lake Okeechobee Watershed – Patrick J. Bohlen1, Stanley Gathumbi1, Kathleen McKee2, Mark Clark2 and Sabine Grunwald2; 1Archbold Biological Station, MacArthur Agro-Ecology Research Center, Lake Placid, FL; 2University of Florida, Soil and Water Science, Gainesville, FL

10:40am-11:00am

ReCiprocating Constructed Wetlands for Treating High Strength Anaerobic Lagoon Wastewater – Leslie Behrends, E. Bailey, W. Ellison, L. Houke, P. Jansen, C. Shea, S. Smith and T. Yost; Tennessee Valley Authority, Department of Air Land and Water Sciences, Muscle Shoals, AL, USA

11:00am-11:20am

Performance of Stormwater Treatment Wetlands Receiving Low Phosphorus Agricultural Drainage Water: Implications for Design and Management – John R. White1, K. Ramesh Reddy2 and Jana.Majer Newman3; 1Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; 2Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 3Everglades Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

11:20am-11:40am

Effects of Co-Occurring Agricultural Pollutants on Nitrogen Removal by a Constructed Coastal Wetland – Michael F. Piehler1, Sara W. McMillan1, Suzanne P. Thompson1 and Amy C. Poe2; 1UNC Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, NC; 2Janicki Environmental, St Petersburg, FL

11:40am-12:00pm

The Use of Mangrove Forests to Treat Shrimp Ponds Effluents in the Neotropics: Current Issues and Viability – V. H. Rivera-Monroy1, D. Gauthier 2, R. R. Twilley1, J. W. Day3, E. Castaneda1 and H. Corrales2; 1Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana USA; 2Granjas Marinas San Bernardo, Choluteca, Honduras; 3Coastal Ecology Institute, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana USA

Session B2: Trace Elements - Abell Hall

Session Chair: Robert P. Gambrell

10:20am-10:40am

The Role of Wetland Trees in Element Cycling and Dispersal, Sky Lake, Mississippi – Stan Galicki1, Gregg R. Davidson2 and Stephen R. Threlkeld3; 1Department of Geology, Millsaps College, Jackson, MS; 2Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, University of Mississippi, University, MS; 3Department of Biology, University of Mississippi, University, MS

10:40am-11:00am

Fate of Long-lived Artificial Radionuclides in Standing Aquatic Ecosystems of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone – D. Gudkov1, A. Kulachinsky2, A. Nazarov2, L. Zub3, V. Mashina1 and A. Savitsky4; 1Institute of Hydrobiology, Kiev, Ukraine; 2State Specialised Research Enterprise “Chernobyl Radioecological Centre”, Chernobyl, Ukraine; 3Shmalgauzen Institute of Zoology, Kiev, Ukraine; 4Kholodny Institute of Botany, Kiev, Ukraine

11:00am-11:20am

Heavy Metals in Phragmites australis and Phalaris arundinacea Growing in Constructed Wetlands Treating Municipal Sewage – J. Vymazal1, J. Svehla2 and V. Chrastny2; 1ENKI o.p.s, Trebon, Czech Republic; 2University of South Bohemia, Department of Chemistry, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic

11:20am-11:40am

Factors Affecting Metal Mobility and Bioavailability in Intertidal Sediments of the Scheldt Estuary – G. Du Laing, D. Vanthuyne, F. M. G. Tack and M. G. Verloo; Ghent University, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Ghent, Belgium

12:00am-1:00pm

BOX LUNCH PROVIDED

Session C1: Treatment of Municipal Wastewater in Constructed and Natural Wetlands - Laborde Hall

Session Chair: Marco Belmont

1:00pm-1:20pm

Assessing Trace Metal Accumulation in a Constructed Wetland Receiving Domestic Wastewater – Els Lesage1, D.P.L. Rousseau2, F.M.G. Tack1, M.G. Verloo1 and N. De Pauw2; 1Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Ghent, Belgium; 2Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology, Ghent, Belgium

1:20pm-1:40pm

Rejuvenating the Largest Municipal Treatment Wetland in Florida – H. Wang1, J.W. Jawitz1, J.R. White2 and M. D. Sees3; 1Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 2Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; 3City of Orlando, Public Works Department, Bureau of Waste Water, Orlando, FL

1:40pm-2:00pm

Biotreatment of Municipal Wastewater with Constructed Wetlands at Oahu, Hawaii – P. A. Pier, R. A. Almond and L. L. Behrends; Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL

2:00pm-2:20pm

A Review of Wetland Waste Water Assimilation in the Louisiana Coastal Zone – John Day; Dept. of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

2:20pm-2:40pm

Presence of Pharmaceuticals in a Large Treatment Wetland in Florida, USA – Marco A. Belmont1, John R. White1 and Chris D. Metcalfe2; 1 Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA; 2 Water Quality Centre, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada

2:40pm-3:00pm

BREAK

Session C2: Biogeochemistry of International Wetland Systems- Abell Hall

Session Chair: Victor H. Rivera-Monroy

1:00pm-1:20pm

The Biodiversity of Lake Victoria Wetlands: Case Study of the Giant Yala Swamp, Nyando and Sondu-Miriu Wetlands, Kenya – John Vorster1 and Judith Akinyi Omollo2; 1Research Assistant, VIRED Int’l, Kisumu, Kenya; 2Environmental Educator, C/O Yago Primary School, Suna-Migori, Kenya

1:20pm-1:40pm

Coupling Oligotrophy and Peat Development in a Coastal Freshwater Swamp of Panamá – T. Troxler-Gann and D. Childers; Florida International University, Department of Biological Sciences and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL

1:40pm-2:00pm

An Assessment of the Human Impact on a Tropical Coastal Wetland Ecosystem – K. Shadananan Nair; Centre for Earth Research & Environment Management, Vaikom, Kerala, India

2:00pm-2:20pm

Activity and Controls of Methanogenesis in Catotelm of Acid Peatlands from Central Russia – I. Kravchenko1 and A. Sirin2; 1Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology RAS, Moscow, Russia; 2Institute of Forest Science RAS, Moscow Region, Russia

2:20pm-2:40pm

Seasonal Nitrogen Dynamics in the Pichavaram Mangrove Forest, India – M. Bala Krishna Prasad and AL. Ramanathan; School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India

2:40pm-3:00pm

BREAK

Session D1: Overviews of Treatment Wetlands - Laborde Hall

Session Chair: Stephen Davis

3:00pm-3:20pm

Meeting the Challenge of Meshing Dual Roles for Stormwater Treatment Areas in South Florida – Jana Majer Newman; Everglades Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

3:20pm-3:40pm

Stormwater Treatment Areas for Everglades Protection: Capabilities and Limitations – Thomas A. DeBusk, John Juston and Forrest E. Dierberg; DB Environmental, Inc., Rockledge, FL

3:40pm-4:00pm

Forested Wetland Dynamics Receiving Treated Municipal Wastewater: Nutrient Interactions and Forest Productivity – Christopher G. Brantley and John W. Day, Jr.; Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, School of the Coast and Environment, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

4:00pm-4:20pm

Screening Aquatic Plants for Nitrate Removal Potential – Leslie L Behrends, E. Bailey, L Houck, P. Jansen, P. Pier and T. Yost; Department of Air Land and Water Sciences, Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL USA

4:20pm-4:40pm

Losses of Nitrogen Through Various Mechanisms Under Flooded Rice Eco-System – D. K. Das and Pintu Sur; Department of Agricultural Chemistry & Soil Science, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Nadia, West Bengal, India

Session D2: Landscape Patterns of Biogeochemical Processes - Abell Hall

Session Chair: Patrick Megonigal

3:00pm-3:20pm

Geostatistical Analyses of Soils Data from Water Conservation Area 3, South Florida – Gregory L. Bruland1, Sabine Grunwald1, Todd Z. Osborne1, K. Ramesh Reddy1 and Sue Newman2; 1University of Florida/IFAS, Soil and Water Science Department, Gainesville, FL; 2South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

3:20pm-3:40pm

Primary Production and Respiration Rates of Microbial Mats in an Oceanic Mangrove Ecosystem – Rosalynn Y. Lee, Samantha B. Joye and Christof Meile; University of Georgia, Department of Marine Sciences, Athens, GA, USA

3:40pm-4:00pm

Wetland Macrophyte Decomposition under Different Nutrient Conditions: What Is More Important, Litter Quality or Site Quality? – Eliška Rejmánková1, Dagmara Sirová2 and Kateřina Houdková2; 1University of California Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA USA; 2Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice, Czech Republic

4:00pm-4:20pm

Landscape Level Assessment of Nutrient Limitation Using Plant Tissue Nutrient Ratios – R. J. Daoust1,4, C. T. Nietch2, C. S. Hopkinson3 and J. T. Morris1; 1Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 2Water Quality Monitoring Branch, US Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 3Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, USA; 4current address: BEM Systems, Inc., West Palm Beach, FL, USA

4:20pm-4:40pm

Soil Nutrient Dynamics in Coastal Wetlands across a Saltwater-Freshwater Continuum on the Logan River Floodplain, South-East Queensland, Australia – Margaret Greenway; School of Environmental Engineering, Griffith University and Cooperative Research Centre for Coastal Zone, Estuary and Waterway Management, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Session D3: Organic Matter and Primary Production - Cook Conference Room

Session Chair: Sue Newman

3:00pm-3:20pm

Gas Exchange Responses of Black Willow (Salix nigra) Cuttings to a Range of Soil Moisture Regimes – S. Li1, S. R. Pezeshki1, S. Goodwin2 and F. D. Shields, Jr.3; 1Department of Biology, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA; 2W. Harry Feinstone Center for Genomic Research, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA; 3USDA-ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford, MS, USA

3:20pm-3:40pm

Seasonal and Geomorphological Variability of the Quantity and Quality of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in the Florida Coastal Everglades – Nagamitsu Maie, Kathleen Parish and Rudolf Jaffé; Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL USA

3:40pm-4:00pm

Changes In Humic Acid Type In Cowdung And Poultry Manure Amended Wetland Soils – F. Rahman, U. A. Naher, A. T. M. S. Hossian, M. A. Saleque and M. A. M. Miah; Soil Science Division, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, Gazipur, Bangladesh

4:00pm-4:20pm

Organic Matter and Amino Acids in Wetlandsoils – J. Omote; Environmental Eco Technology Institute, Tokyo & Kinki University Technical College, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Mie, Japan

Social Events and Poster Session – Energy Coast and Environmental Building

5:00pm-5:30pm

WBI Library Dedication Ceremony - Rotunda Conference Room & Auditorium

5:00pm-7:00pm

Poster Session I & WBI Reception - Memorial to Dr. William Patrick - Rotunda Conference Room & Auditorium

5:00pm-7:00pm

Tour of the Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute’s Facilities

Tuesday, March 22, 2005

7:30am-5:00pm

Registration – Lobby of Cook Conference Center

Plenary Session II - Laborde Hall, Cook Conference Center

Session Chair: Curtis Richardson

8:30am-9:10am

Benthic Microbial Mats: Important Sources Of Fixed Nitrogen And Carbon in Mangrove Wetlands – Samantha B. Joye; University of Georgia, Department of Marine Sciences, Athens, GA, USA

9:10am-9:50am

Regulation of Salt Marsh Primary Production, Geomorphology and Biogeochemical Cycles by Variation in Mean Sea Level – James T. Morris; University of South Carolina, Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia, SC, USA

9:50am-10:20am

BREAK

Session B1: Controls of Nutrient Removal - Abell Hall

Session Chair: Jos T. A. Verhoeven

10:20am-10:40am

Effect of Macrophyte Diversity and Community Composition on Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles: An Experimental Study in Mesocosm – Virginie Bouchard1, Serita Frey2, Janice Gilbert1 and Sharon Reed1; 1School of Natural Resources, Ohio State University; 2Department of Natural Resources, University of New Hampshire

10:40am-11:00am

Vegetation and Sediment Gradients in Wetland Mesocosms Used for Low-Level Phosphorus Removal – Michelle Kharbanda, Thomas A. DeBusk, Forrest E. Dierberg and Scott D. Jackson; DB Environmental, Inc., Rockledge, FL

11:00am-11:20am

Wetland N and P Dynamics along a Gradient of Vegetation Productivity and Soil pH – R. Merckx1 and M. Drouillon2; 1Catholic University of Leuven, Lab for Soil and Water Management, Heverlee, Belgium; 2Hogeschool West-Vlaanderen, Department of Industrial Engineering and Technology, Kortrijk, Belgium

11:20am-11:40am

Effects of Vegetation Type on Soil Accrual and Phosphorus Stability in Wetlands Receiving Agricultural Drainage – Kevin A. Grace1, Forrest E. Dierberg1 and John R. White2; 1DB Environmental, Inc., Rockledge, FL; 2Wetlands Biogeochemistry Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

11:40am-12:00pm

Phenol Oxidase as a Regulator of Atmospheric Carbon Sequestration and Bioremediation in Wetlands – Chris Freeman; School of Biological Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, UK

Session B2: Ecosystem Structure and Function - Laborde Hall

Session Chair: Christopher Craft

10:20am-10:40am

Development of Heterotrophic Microbial Processes and Food Webs Following Salt Marsh Creation – C. Craft1 and J. P. Megonigal2; 1School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; 2 Smithsonian Environmental Research Laboratory, Edgewater, MD, USA

10:40am-11:00am

Phosphorus Sorption Capacity and Exchange by Soils from Mitigated and Late Successional Bottomland Forest Wetlands – E. M. D'Angelo1, A. D. Karathanasis1 and E. J. Sparks2; 1Soil and Water Biogeochemistry Lab, Horticulture, Plant, and Soil Science Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA; 2US Army Corps of Engineers, Eastern Kentucky Regulatory Office, KY, USA

11:00am-11:20am

Marsh Plant Growth Response and Metal Uptake from Amended Red Mud Substrates in Greenhouse and Field Studies – Robert P. Gambrell1, Cale LeBlanc2, Norman Murray3 and Lorna Putnam1; 1Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; 2Conestoga-Rover and Associates, Baton Rouge, LA; 3Norman Murray and Associates, Covington, LA

11:20am-11:40am

Phosphorus Enrichment and Restoration of the Everglades – S. Newman1, P. V. McCormick2, K. R. Reddy3 and B. L. Turner4; 1Everglades Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA; 2Leetown Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Kearneysville, WV, USA; 3Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory, Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 4 Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama

1:40am-12:00pm

Chemical Speciation of Phosphorus as an Index of Alterations in Ecosystem Structure and Function – Curtis J. Richardson1, P. V. Sundareshwar2 , Wyatt H. Hartman2 and Greg. L. Bruland3; 1Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Durham, NC; 2Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines, Rapid City, SD; 3University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville, FL

12:00-1:00p.m.

BOX LUNCH PROVIDED

Session C1: Techniques in Biogeochemistry - Abell Hall

Session Chair: Greg Bruland

1:00pm-1:20pm

Preliminary Evaluation of a Laboratory Scale Wastewater Treatment by Constructed Subsurface Flow Wetlands Planted with Ornamental Plants of Commercial Interest – F. Zurita1, J. de Anda2, Y. Herrera1 and V. Delgado1; 1Centro Universitario de la Ciénega. UdeG. México; 2Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco, México

1:20pm-1:40pm

Phosphorous Sequestration Using Al-containing Amendments in Organic Soils from a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Wetland – John R. White1 and Lynette M. Malecki2; 1Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA; 2Wetlands Biogeochemistry Laboratory, Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

1:40pm-2:00pm

Inference of Phosphorus Sorption Capacity in Southeastern Wetland Soils using Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) – Matthew Cohen, Mark Clark, Jeremy Paris and K. Ramesh Reddy; University of Florida, Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory, Soil and Water Science Department, Gainesville FL, USA

2:00pm-2:20pm

An Evaluation of Two Tracers Commonly Applied to Surface-Flow Wetlands: Rhodamine-WT and Lithium – Forrest E. Dierberg and Thomas A. DeBusk; DB Environmental, Inc., Rockledge, FL

2:20pm-2:40pm

Population Genetic Structure of Rhizophora stylosa (Griff.) in Sakishima Islands, Japan Based on Variation at Nuclear and Chloroplast Microsatellite (SSR) Loci – Md. Sajedul Islam1, Chunlan Lian2, Norikazu Kameyama3, Bingyun Wu1 and Taizo Hogetsu1; 1Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the University of Tokyo, Japan; 2Asian Natural Environmental Science Center, the University of Tokyo, Japan; 3Faculty of Agriculture, University of the Ryukyus, Japan

2:40pm-3:00pm

BREAK

Session C2: Biogeochemical Patterns of Pulsed Ecosystems - Laborde Hall

Session Chair: Patrick Bohlen

1:00pm-1:20pm

The Effect of the Caernarvon Freshwater Diversion on Water Quality in the Breton Sound Estuary – Robert R. Lane1, John W. Day1,2, Emily Hyfield1,2 and Jason N. Day1; 1Coastal Ecology Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; 2Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

1:20pm-1:40pm

Freshwater and Nutrient Inputs to a Mississippi River Deltaic Estuary with River Re-Introduction – Emily C.G. Hyfield1, John W. Day1,2, Jaye E. Cable1,2 and Dubravko Justic1,2; 1Coastal Ecology Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; 2 Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

1:40pm-2:00pm

Pelagic and Benthic Nutrient Conversions in a Coastal Watershed Influenced by River Diversions (Caernarvon, Louisiana) – J. J. Rick1, S. Rick1 and R. R. Twilley2; 1University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Department of Biology, Lafayette, LA, USA; 2Louisiana State University, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science, Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Baton Rouge, LA, USA

2:00pm-2:20pm

Influence Of Freshwater Diversions And Drought On Peat and Porewater Sulfur Dynamics in Coastal Louisiana Peat Marshes – C. M. Swarzenski1, T.W. Doyle2 and B. Fry3; 1United States Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA, USA; 2United States Geological Survey, Lafayette, LA, USA; 3Coastal Ecology Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA

2:20pm-2:40pm

Factors Affecting Tidal Creek Hydrodynamics and Materials Exchange Between Salt Marshes and Adjacent Bays of the Guadalupe Estuary (TX) – Stephen E. Davis, III1 and J. Bryan Allison2; 1Department of Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX; 2Department of Geology & Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

2:40pm-3:00pm

BREAK

Session D1: Thematic Session of 9th International Symposium - Laborde Hall

Session Chair: Robert Twilley

3:00pm-3:20pm

Role of Phosphorus in Assessing Ecosystem Response to Anthropogenic Impact and Global Environmental Change Studies – P. V. Sundareshwar1, Eric Koepfler2 and C. J. Richardson3; 1Center for Biocomplexity Studies, Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, Rapid City, SD; 2Coastal Carolina University; 3Duke University Wetland Center, Duke University, Durham, NC

3:20pm-3:40pm

Incorporating Socio-ecological Considerations into Environmental Restoration Efforts: Examples from the Florida Everglades – D. L. Childers; Department of Biological Sciences and SERC, Florida International University, Miami FL

3:40pm-4:00pm

Contribution of Benthic Mats to Vertical Accretion and Deposition of C and N in Caribbean Mangrove Forests – Karen L. McKee1 and Samantha B. Joye2; 1National Wetlands Research Center-USGS, Lafayette, LA, USA; 2University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA

4:00pm-4:20pm

Recent Discoveries of Surprising Anaerobic Organisms and Novel Pathways – J. Patrick Megonigal; Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, Maryland, USA

4:20pm-4:40pm

Wetlands and Water Quality: A Landscape Perspective – J. T. A. Verhoeven1, B. Arheimer2, Chengqing Yin3 and M. M. Hefting1; 1Landscape Ecology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; 2Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, PR China

Social Events and Poster Session – Cook Conference Center

5:00pm-7:00pm

Poster Session II - Abell Room

7:30pm-9:00pm

Symposium Banquet - Laborde Hall

 

Wednesday, March 23, 2005

Plenary Session III - Laborde Hall, Cook Conference Center

Session Chair: K. Ramesh Reddy 

8:30am-9:10am

Functional Assessment of Biogeochemistry: Conceptual Models Based on North American WetlandsMark M. Brinson; Biology Department, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina

9:10am-9:50am

Functional Assessment of Biogeochemistry: Conceptual Models Based on European WetlandsEdward Maltby; Director, Institute for Sustainable Water, Intergrated Management & Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER), University of Liverpool

9:50am-10:20am

BREAK

Session B1: Nutrient Removal Techniques - Abell Hall, Cook Conference Center

Session Chair: Eliska Rejmánková

10:20am-10:40am

Comparison of Phosphorus Removal by Two Submerged Plants: The Invasive, Exotic Hydrilla verticillata and the Native Najas guadalupensisScott D. Jackson, Forrest E. Dierberg, Lisa Canty and Thomas A. DeBusk; DB Environmental, Inc., Rockledge, FL

10:40am-11:00am

Phosphorus Removal Performance of a Harvestable Pasture Grass Cultivated in a Treatment Wetland – Patrick Owens and Thomas A. DeBusk; DB Environmental, Inc., Rockledge, FL

11:00am-11:20am

Effect of Integrated Nutrient Management on the Maintenance of Soil Fertility Under Flooded Rice Eco-System – Pintu Sur and D. K. Das; Department of Agricultural Chemistry & Soil Science, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Nadia, West Bengal, India

11:20am-11:40am

Reciprocating Constructed Wetlands: Influence of Organic Loading Rate, Reciprocation Cycle Time and Planting Regime – Leslie Behrends1, Laura Houke1, Earl Baily1 Pat Jansen1 and Don Brown2; 1Tennessee Valley Authority, Department of Air Land and Water Sciences, Muscle Shoals, Al USA; 2US EPA, Cincinnati, Ohio

11:40am-12:00pm

Important of Natural Wetlands for Polluted Water Treatment – Igor Prokofev and Ludmila Zhirina; Bryansk State Engineering-Technology Academy and Environmental NGO VIOLA, Bryansk, Russia

Session B2: Nutrient Transformation Patterns - Laborde Hall

Session Chair: Tiffany Troxler-Gann

10:20am-10:40am

Direct Measurement of Denitrification Activity in a Gulf Coast Freshwater Marsh Receiving Diverted Mississippi River Water – Kewei Yu1, Ronald D. DeLaune1 and Pascal Boeckx2; 1Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA; 2Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Applied Physical Chemistry (ISOFYS), Ghent University, Gent, Belgium

10:40am-11:00am

Nitrogen Removal of a Large River Swamp System -- The Atchafalaya River Basin – Y. Jun Xu; School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA

11:00am-11:20am

Nutrient Transformations During Floodplain Inundation – Durelle Scott, Judson Harvey and Gregory Noe; U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA

11:20am-11:40am

Extracellular Enzyme Activity and Distribution in Benthic Cyanobacterial Mats: Comparison between Nutrient Enriched and Unimpacted Sites in Marshes of Northern Belize – D. Sirova1, J. Vrba1,2 and E. Rejmankova3; 1University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic; 2Hydrobiological Institute AS CR, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic; 3University of California, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Davis, CA, USA

11:40am-12:00pm

Change in Nitrate Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of the Soil according to the Duration of Flood Suppression in a Recently Reflooded Area (the Polder of Erstein East of France) – S. Defraeye and M. Trémolières; Centre d'Ecologie Végétale et d'Hydrologie CEVH, Strasbourg, France

12:00pm

Symposium Concludes

Return to Index


Symposium Social Events

Sunday, 20 March, 2005 -- 6:00pm-8:00pm

Welcome & Co-Chair Reception at Cook Conference Center:  Be sure to arrive in New Orleans in time for our symposium opener. With the support of British Petroleum, WBI is pleased to host this opening reception at the Cook Conference Center.


Monday, 21 March, 2005 -- 5:00pm-7:00pm

SC&E PictureWBI Reception and Memorial to Dr. William Patrick: A tour of the Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute’s facilities, located in the School of the Coast and Environment building, will be given during the Monday Reception and Poster Session.  A short ceremony dedicating the WBI Library will be held in the Auditorium at 5 pm, followed by the poster session and tour of WBI facilities. 

The School of the Coast and Environment at LSU exists to provide knowledge, technology, and human resources for successful management of natural resources and resolution of environmental issues important to Louisiana, the Gulf of Mexico region, and comparable areas throughout the nation and the world.  They, together with scientists in the Coastal Ecology Institute and the Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, provide expert assistance for the management, restoration, and preservation of Louisiana's invaluable coastal wetlands.  http://www.sc&e.lsu.edu/


Tuesday, 22 March, 2005 -- 7:30pm

Symposium Banquet: The symposium banquet will be held on Tuesday evening in the Laborde Hall of the Cook Conference Center starting at 7:30 pm.  The banquet is part of the symposium registration fee.

Return to Index


Organize a Session

Interested in organizing a session for the symposium? Following are the special sessions requested on use of new tools, techniques and assessments of biogeochemical processes:

  • Organize a session on biocomplexity of biogeochemical processes.

  • Organize a session on some techniques that link biological organization with plot, landscape, and global fluxes of biogeochemical elements.

  • Organize a session on some new assessments that link biogeochemical processes and functions as part of comprehensive ecosystem restoration and management.

  • Organize a session on new estimates of ecosystem and global chemical fluxes that integrate temporal and spatial scales with interactions among elements.

Contact Robert Twilley at rtwilley@lsu.edu to organize a session.

Return to Index


Registration Information

What Does the Symposium Attendee Registration Fee Include? The symposium registration fee allows each registrant to receive one copy of the printed abstract book to be distributed at the symposium and registration materials including a canvas tote bag. The registration fee also includes attendance at the Sunday Welcome Reception, the Monday Poster Session and Reception, and the Tuesday evening Symposium Dinner Banquet. Box lunches will be provided on Monday and Tuesday and daily morning, mid-day and afternoon refreshments will also be provided. The Cook Conference Center & Hotel is offering a complimentary breakfast to its guests each morning. A reduced fee is available for students. A photocopy of a valid student ID must accompany student registration forms.

PLEASE NOTE: Payment must accompany registration and be
received by the dates indicated to qualify for the applicable fee.

SYMPOSIUM ATTENDEE REGISTRATION FEES

Early Registration (Register and Pay by February 1, 2005)
Symposium Attendee Fee US $280.00
Student Attendee Fee
 (Valid Student Identification Required)*
US $175.00
Regular/On-site Registration (Register and Pay after February 1, 2005)
Symposium Attendee Fee US $350.00
Student Attendee Fee
 (Valid Student Identification Required)*
US $250.00
*A photocopy of a valid student ID must accompany student registration forms. If you register online, please FAX the student ID form and indicate your registration was submitted online.
One Day Registration
One Day Attendee Fee US $125.00
This includes participation to all activities during the one day of attendance, one copy of the printed abstract book, and registration materials including a canvas tote bag.

GUEST REGISTRATION FEES

Guest Fee   US $40.00
Guest Registration Fee - The guest registration fee includes participation at the Tuesday Dinner Banquet.  (Guests do not receive meeting materials.)


 

Registration Confirmation: An email notice acknowledging we received your online registration submission will be sent within three business days. Please do not contact us to verify we received your online registration before this three-day period has elapsed. Formal written confirmation and a hard copy of your receipt will be mailed to you within three weeks of receiving your completed registration form and appropriate payment.

Refund Policy: Requests for registration refunds will be honored if a written notification of cancellation is received by the Office of Conferences & Institutes on or before February 21, 2005.  A $50.00 processing fee will be deducted from all registration refunds and a $25.00 processing fee will be deducted from all student registration refunds.  A $10.00 fee will be deducted from all Guest fee registration refunds.  Sorry, no refunds will be honored for cancellations after February 21, 2005.

Special Needs: Participants with special needs can be reasonably accommodated by contacting the Office of Conferences & Institutes at least 10 working days prior to the conference. We can be reached by phone at 1-352-392-5930, by fax at 1-352-392-9734, or by calling 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The TDD number can only be accessed from within the State of Florida.

We are delighted you wish to register for the 9th  International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands.

Advanced registration is closed, however, we will be happy to register you onsite at the conference.

Return to Index


Location & Accommodations


The Lod & Carole Cook Conference Center & Hotel at LSU

Hotel accommodations and the Symposium sessions will be held at The Lod & Carole Cook Conference Center & Hotel at LSU.

The Lod & Carole Cook Conference Center & Hotel is located just off I-10 and Dalrymple Drive, overlooking the scenic University lakes in the heart of Louisiana State University's campus. Guests can start each day by enjoying a complimentary full breakfast served in the Shaquille O’Neal Lodge. The hotel offers an outdoor pool and spa and a business center equipped with computer, copier and phone. Room amenities include individual climate control, iron and ironing boards, in-room coffee maker and coffee, 27” television with full Cox Cable Service and LodgeNet entertainment selections and dual phone lines with voice mail and DATA ports. Guests may also enjoy a fitness center and the LSU Alumni Shelton Tiger Gift Shop. In addition, guests may access the adjacent LSU Recreational Complex for a nominal fee. The complex offers 112-thousand square feet of exercise space including basketball, racquetball and tennis courts, as well as three weight rooms and a cardio-theatre. Located only 10 miles from the Baton Rouge Metro Airport.

The Lod & Carole Cook Conference Center & Hotel is offering the following special rates for symposium participants:

Standard Rooms (plus 13% tax)
Single/Double: $78.00
Triple: $88.00
Quad: $98.00

Suites (plus 13% tax)
Single/Double: $99.00
Triple: $109.00
Quad: $119.00

This discounted rate will be honored three days prior and three days following the symposium, based on availability. To make a reservation at the reduced rates, call the hotel directly at 1-(225)-383-COOK(2665). Be sure to identify yourself as being with the 9th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands.

All reservation requests will require a guarantee with a credit card or a one-night advance payment on or before Friday, February 25, 2005. This advance payment is non-refundable if the guest does not arrive as schedules, or changes or cancels the reservation less than 72 hours prior to arrival. After Friday, February 25, 2005, the discounted group rate may not be available.

Rooms are available for check-in on the day of arrival after 3:00pm. Checkout is at 12:00 noon. If you are arriving early or leaving late, the hotel has a secured baggage area.

Return to Index


Related Sites of Interest

Society of
Wetland Scientists

biogeosciences.org Home page


American Society of Agricultural Engineers


North American Lake
Management Society

AllConferences.Com


EcoSpeakers.com

urn to Index


Area Information

Return to Index


Travel Information


Click here to find driving directions to Baton Rouge, LA from any address/destination in the USA by simply typing in the starting address and then the end destination address; very user friendly.

Start: Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport
9430 Jackie Cochran Dr.
Baton Rouge, LA 70807-8020
Phone: (225)-355-0333

End: Cook Conference Center and Hotel at LSU
3848 W Lakeshore Dr,
Baton Rouge, LA 70808-4600
Phone: (225)-383- 2665

Start: Louis Armstrong New Orleans Int’l Airport
900 Airline Drive, Kenner, LA 70062 US
Phone: (504) 464-0831

End: Cook Conference Center and Hotel at LSU
3848 W Lakeshore Dr,
Baton Rouge, LA 70808-4600
Phone: (225)-383- 2665

Avis is offering special rental 
rates to Symposium 
attendees. Click here to 
make reservations.


Travel information from the
US Department of State

Return to Index


Sponsor Appreciation

Special Thanks to our Symposium Sponsor

 

This symposium would not be possible without the financial support of a donation by BP to the School of the Coast and Environment (SCE). This donation was part of a contribution to SCE to support knowledge in the restoration of coastal Louisiana. The symposium co-chairs and the LSU School of the Coast and Environment thank BP for their generous support of this professional symposium.

Return to Index


For Additional Information

Program Information:

Dr. Robert R. Twilley, Symposium Co-chair
Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute
Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Email: rtwilley@lsu.edu
PH (1): 225-578-8806 / PH (2): 225-578-6431
FAX: 225-578-6423

 

Dr. K. R. Reddy, Symposium Co-chair
University of Florida
Soil and Water Science Department
Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory
PO Box 110510 / Gainesville, FL 32611
PH: 1-352-392-1804 / FAX: 1-352-392-3399
EMAIL: krr@ifas.ufl.edu

 

Karen Gros

Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803-7511
Email: cowgro@lsu.edu
PH (1): 225-578-8806 / PH (2): 225-578-6431
FAX: 225-578-6423

Registration Information:

Tracy Nininger and Kim Brand
University of Florida/IFAS
Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)
Building 639, Mowry Road
PO Box 110750 / Gainesville, FL 32611-0750
PH: 1-352-392-5930 / FAX: 1-352-392-9734
EMAIL: tnnininger@ifas.ufl.edu   - or -
            khbrand@ifas.ufl.edu

 

 


 

 

Return to Index


You are visitor number: Hit Counter since 06/14/04.
This page is designed and maintained by: Greg Wilson the UF/IFAS/OCI Graphics Editor and Webmaster.

[OCI Home Page]