Speaker Biographies

2008 Florida Ruminant Nutrition Symposium


January 29-30, 2008

Best Western Gateway Grand l Gainesville, FL


Dr. Adesogan is an Assistant Professor of Ruminant Nutrition in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Florida where he holds a 40% teaching-60% research assignment. He served as an Assistant Professor of Animal Nutrition at the University of Wales in Aberystwyth, UK between 1995 and 2001. Dr. Adesogan’s research presentation was selected as the most outstanding from the Animal Nutrition session during the 1994 meeting of European Association of Animal Production. His research interests include improving the utilization of forages with dietary additives, exploiting the potential of forages for improving the level and efficiency of sustainable animal production, developing in vitro methods for nutritionally-characterizing feeds, and using plant neutraceuticals to improve animal welfare, health, and production and thereby enhance human nutrition and health.

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Dr. Lance Baumgard is from southwest Minnesota where he was raised on a row crop and pig farm.  He got his BS and MS degree’s from the University of Minnesota and his PhD from Cornell in 2001. He joined the faculty at the University of Arizona in 2001 and was promoted to Associate Professor in the spring of 2007. His research program concentrates on the energetics of the transition cow, heat stress and milk fat.

 

 

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Dr. Joy Campbell received a B.S in Dairy Science from Iowa State University, M.S. in Ruminant Nutrition and Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Upon graduation, Dr. Campbell joined Iowa State University Swine Nutrition group as a post-doctoral research associate working to develop value-added corn for swine nutrition applications. Following her post-doc, Dr. Campbell joined APC, Inc. working in research and development. Dr. Campbell’s research at APC includes development of new products towards improved animal health and nutrition. Dr. Campbell works in multiple species and has conducted research trials both domestically and internationally. Her work has focused on the role of functional animal proteins on the intestinal health of domestic animals. Her work has led to the development of several innovative products to several industries, including the swine, poultry, ruminant, aquaculture and pet food industries. Dr. Campbell also provides technical support worldwide. Dr. Campbell is a member of several professional associations and has authored or co-authored 30 refereed publications, 37 abstracts, 3 patents, and 29 proceedings and technical publications. Dr. Campbell and her husband, Rick, reside in Ames, IA with their children, Cara and Adam.

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Dr. Gordon Carstens grew up working on his family's crop and beef cattle operation in west central Iowa. He received his undergraduate degree from Iowa State University and graduate degrees from Colorado State University. Currently, Gordon is an Associate Professor of Ruminant Nutrition in the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in animal nutrition and conducts beef cattle research. His research program is focused on development of strategies to improve the energetic efficiency of beef production systems. Research is his lab is currently focused on the delineation of the biological basis for genetic variation in the efficiency of nutrient utilization of growing beef cattle.

 

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Dr. Matt Hersom is an Assistant Professor and Extension Beef Cattle Specialist in the Animal Sciences Department at the University of Florida. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Animal Science at Iowa State University and the Ph.D. at Oklahoma State University. His research efforts have focused on year-round grazing systems to minimize stored feed inputs and optimize forage utilization by spring calving beef cows, the effect of previous live weight gain during winter grazing on feedlot performance, visceral organ mass, body composition, and splanchnic metabolism of beef steers. His current research and extension program emphasizes the implementation of optimal supplementation strategies for Florida cow-calf production and the development of increased pasture and forage utilization and management.

 

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Dr. Gary M. Hill received his BS (1969) in Animal Science from Clemson University, Clemson, SC, and his MS (1974) and PhD (1977) degrees in Animal Science from The University of Kentucky, Lexington. He was an Associate Professor in Animal Science at Louisiana State University for 6.5 years before moving to The University of Georgia in 1983. At The University of Georgia, Tifton Campus, he has had a multifaceted beef cattle research program, including forage evaluation, grazing management, hay and forage quality and digestibility, by-product utilization, and feedlot management and nutrition. His research was instrumental in development of Tifton 85 bermudagrass and Tifton 9 bahiagrass. He directs research projects with 450 beef cows, and approximately 200 stocker steers and heifers annually at Tifton Campus. He has authored or co-authored 415 publications, including 54 journal articles and 12 invited international papers. He has served on Southern Section ASAS and national ASAS committees. In 1999, he received the Senior Scientist Award of Excellence in Research from The University of Georgia, CAES, Tifton Campus. He was the recipient of the 2006 Southern Section ASAS Distinguished Service Award for research achievements in ruminant nutrition and forages.

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Dr. Arnold Hippen is a Professor of Dairy Science at South Dakota State University. Dr. Hippen received the B.S. (‘91) degree in Dairy Science, and M.S. (‘96) and Ph.D. (97) degrees in Nutritional Physiology from Iowa State University. Prior to completing his degrees, he operated a dairy farm in North-Central Iowa and worked as a feed dealer for Moorman Mfg. His current appointment at South Dakota State University consists of teaching dairy farm management and dairy cattle nutrition to undergraduate and graduate students as well as conducting research on modification of milk fat, feeding byproducts to dairy cows, and prevention of fatty liver and ketosis. His research has resulted in publication of over 30 manuscripts, 1 book chapter, and 60 abstracts for presentation at regional and national meetings as well as 2 patents for products for ketosis prevention. Current research by Dr. Hippen is primarily investigating the interactions of ethanol by- products with other ingredients in diets of dairy cattle and their effects on cow health and metabolism.

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Dr. Fred Owens grew up on a farm in Wisconsin and did his graduate work at the University of Minnesota. He spent 6 years in the Animal Science Department at the University of Illinois before joining the faculty at Oklahoma State University. At Oklahoma State, Fred conducted research on rumen function, metabolic disorders, feed intake, feed additives, and growth and development. During his 24 years at Oklahoma State, Fred was Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Animal Science and won the Morrison Award from the American Society of Animal Science. In 1998, Fred retired from Oklahoma State to start a new career with DuPont Specialty Grains that was folded into Pioneer Hi-Bred when DuPont purchased Pioneer. As Senior Ruminant Research Nutritionist at Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Fred is involved with developing and testing cereal crops and oilseeds that have been or can be altered to improve both nutrient availability and quality of milk and meat produced by ruminants.

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Dr. Matt Poore was born in southern Virginia in 1959, and he spent every summer working in tobacco, fixing fences, putting up hay, and working with the cattle on his family’s farm in NC. While growing up in Northern Arizona Dr. Poore also worked on a variety of ranches and maintained a small herd of dairy goats.

Dr. Poore received his BS degree in Animal Science from The University of Arizona in 1982. While at the U of A, Dr. Poore met his spouse, Dr. Jeannette Moore and after graduation they moved to Oxford, NC to take over the family’s farm. After two years they made the decision to return to graduate school at the University of Arizona. Dr. Poore received his MS degree in 1987, and his PhD in 1990. Throughout his graduate training Dr. Poore’s research focused on how associative effects between diet ingredients influence nutrient utilization in mixed diets.

After graduation Dr. Poore joined the Department of Animal Science at North Carolina State University with responsibilities for programs dealing with Beef Cattle Nutritional Management. Dr. Poore was promoted to Associate Professor in 1996, and to Professor in 2005. In 2002 Dr. Poore was appointed as the Coordinator of the Animal Husbandry Group which includes beef, sheep and meat goat programs.

Dr. Poore’s current programs focus on the use of alternative feeds and improved forage management programs for beef cattle, and on management practices that minimize the environmental impact of beef production systems.

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Dr. Jose Santos earned the DVM degree from Sao Paulo State University in Brazil in 1992. After working in private practice for 2 years, Jose came to the University of Arizona to study ruminant nutrition, where he earned the M.S. degree in 1995 and the Ph.D. degree in 1997. Jose joined the faculty of Dairy Production Medicine at the University of California, Davis where he conducted research and clinics from 2000 to 2007. In 2008, Jose joined the Animal Sciences Department at the University of Florida as an Associate Professor. In 2005, he was awarded the Young Scientist Award by the American Dairy Science Association. He is well published in the scientific literature and is a popular speaker at conferences nationally and internationally.
 


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Dr. Charles Staples is a Research Foundation Professor in the Animal Sciences Department at the University of Florida. He earned his Animal Science degrees at New Mexico State University and at the University of Illinois. His current research areas include 1) the effects of dietary lipids, energy, and protein on the production and reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows and 2) the storage and utilization of forages for the dairy herd. He has published 73-refereed scientific articles, 91 papers in conference proceedings, and 70 extension articles. Based upon his research, Dr. Staples was the recipient of the Nutrition Professionals Applied Dairy Nutrition Award by the American Dairy Science Association in 1998. He teaches two senior-level courses in Dairy Cattle Nutrition.

 

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