Sustainable Ecosystem Restoration
Through Integration of Science, Planning and Policy


December 6-10, 2004


Lake Buena Vista, Florida

      

         

Site Index

l Conference Overview l Adaptive Management Workshop l Related Links
l Conference Purpose l Post-Conference Field Trips l Planning Committee
l Who Should Attend? l Registration Information l Local Organizing Committee
l Conference Topics l Display Space Available l For More Information
l Call for Abstracts l List of Exhibitors l One-Page Promotional Flyer (PDF)
l Tentative Agenda l Hotel & Meeting Site
l Best Practices Workshop l Conference Sponsors

l Two-Page Promotional Flyer (PDF)

l Poster Directory l Area Information

l Guidelines for Speakers (PDF)

l Guidelines for Poster Presenters (PDF)

l Conference Abstract Book (PDF - large file contains all abstracts to be presented at the conference)

l Update (11/30) of FINAL CONFERENCE AGENDA --  Adobe PDF format

l Update (11/30) of FINAL POSTER DIRECTORY --  Adobe PDF format

l Final List of NCER Participants -- Microsoft Excel format

Conference Overview

The First National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER) was held December 6-10, 2004 in Orlando, Florida. More than 900 people from 43 states and the District of Columbia attended the conference, including federal, state, and local agency personnel, tribal governments, water resource engineers and managers, environmental consultants, environmental policy managers, ecological scientists and researchers, hydrological modelers, students and environmental interest groups. Four foreign countries were also represented including Canada, Australia, China and the Netherlands, and more than 50 sponsors and partners, who represent all segments of the restoration community, provided support for the conference.

How did the conference come about? In 2002, Lieutenant General Robert Flowers, Chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, convened a meeting of his Environmental Advisory Board (EAB) to garner input on large-scale ecosystem restoration projects, particularly in the Florida Everglades. The EAB, which was created as a means for the Chief of Engineers to gain outside, expert and independent advice on environmental issues facing the Corps of Engineers. At the 2002 meeting, the EAB noted the need for better integration and sharing of scientific information and communication of that information for use in resource management decisions. The Corps and U.S. Geological Survey recognized the potential synergy that could be achieved by jointly sponsoring a conference that merged the planning, policy and science of large-scale restoration programs into a single event, and thus, the NCER was conceived.

Participants were invited to interact in an interdisciplinary setting to review and summarize state-of-the art science, planning and management activities and to formulate goals and approaches to restoration. The conference also provided an opportunity to learn about national ecosystem restoration efforts throughout the country and to learn about large-scale ecosystem restoration programs including Glen Canyon, Everglades, San Francisco Bay/Delta, Chesapeake Bay, Great Lakes, Louisiana Coastal Area, Puget Sound, and the Upper Mississippi River. Throughout the conference, participants investigated challenging restoration-related questions, such as:

  • How do we effectively integrate planning, policy and science such that each contributes to the other in an effective, relevant and timely manner?

  • Are there local, regional and national policies guiding restoration? For restoration projects involving multiple governmental agencies and tribal governments, how do we ensure continuity and completion of large-scale, multiyear restoration projects?

  • How do we ensure that restoration policy facilitate integration of new science, new and improved technology, and new and improved modeling into restoration planning and implementation?

  • How can the scientific information be used to achieve environmental sustainability in restoration programs? How do we set restoration objectives and define success?

  • Are there opportunities for innovative win-win solutions that sustainability integrates humanity and nature in the restored ecosystem?

Restoration of degraded ecosystems has been and continues to be a high priority throughout the Nation. Yet those involved in ecosystem restoration have had limited opportunity to interact with their colleagues at the national scale to discuss issues and challenges relevant to ecosystem restoration. This First National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration and future restoration conferences will continue to serve as a forum for individuals engaged in ecosystem restoration projects to exchange information and “lessons learned” on the challenges and opportunities for sustainable restoration of natural ecosystems.

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Conference Purpose

The purpose of NCER is to provide a forum for physical, biological, and social scientists, engineers, resource managers, and decision-makers to share their knowledge and research results concerning ecosystem restoration throughout the United States. The public forum will exchange information and "lessons learned" on opportunities for and challenges of achieving restoration. Conference participants will have the opportunity to learn about large-scale ecosystem restoration programs (e.g., Glen Canyon, Everglades, San Francisco Bay/Delta, Chesapeake Bay, Great Lakes, Louisiana Coastal Area, Puget Sound, Upper Mississippi River, etc.) and what has contributed to success of as well as lessons learned from these programs. The role of science in establishing goals and performance expectations for achieving successful and sustainable ecosystem restoration will be explored.

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Who Should Attend?

The conference is designed to bring together scientists, engineers, managers, and policy makers who are actively involved in and/or affected by all aspects of ecosystem restoration. Participants will interact in an interdisciplinary setting to summarize and review state-of-the-art science, planning, and management activities, and to formulate goals and approaches to restoration. This includes federal, state, and local agency personnel, tribal governments, water resource engineers, water resource managers, environmental consultants, environmental policy managers, ecological scientists and researchers, hydrological modelers, students, and environmental interest groups.

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Conference Topics

Science Synthesis and Scaling

  • Ecology and Hydrology

  • Modeling

  • Water Quality and Contaminants

  • Fish and Wildlife Population Responses

  • Restoring Processes Below and Through Barriers

  • Integrating Restoration and Water/Land Management Needs

Detecting Change Across Scales

  • Restoration and Invasive Species

  • Effect of Global Change

  • Detecting Change

  • Interim Objectives for Long-Term Trends

  • Performance Measures/Standards

  • Indicators

  • Trend Analysis

  • Sorting Out Natural Variability

  • Determining Outcomes

Planning Restoration

  • Defining "Success" and Setting Objectives

  • Conceptual and Quantitative Models

  • Landscape Scaling

  • Budget Development

  • Cost-Benefit Analysis

  • Scoping (including interest of stakeholders)

Adaptive Management

  • Theory to Application

  • Risk and Uncertainty

  • Framework for Learning

  • Success Stories

  • Collaboration

  • Engineering for Project Robustness

  • Monitoring Program Design

  • Coupling Models and Observations

  • Breaking Through Restoration Barriers/Opportunities and Limitations

Effective Communication Within, Among, and Beyond Restoration Programs

  • Integrating Science Throughout Institutional Structure

  • More Effective Communication Tools

  • Strategic Input of Science in Management Decisions

  • Getting Past Data

  • Role and Obligation of Science to Communicate to the Broader Restoration Community

National Priorities for Ecosystem Restoration

  • National Policies and Programs to Facilitate Restoration

  • Lessons Learned from Large Scale Case Studies: Chesapeake Bay, Everglades, CALFED, Great Lakes, Glen Canyon, Louisiana Coastal Area, Puget Sound, Upper Mississippi River

  • Synthesis of Lessons Learned

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Call for Abstracts

Scientists and managers involved in a restoration effort are strongly encouraged to submit abstracts describing their projects. Special consideration will be given to work that synthesizes existing information. Abstract submissions will be used to select oral and poster presentations, and ALL abstracts, both oral and poster, will be published in the conference book of abstracts and will be posted on the web site following the conference.  Researchers not wishing to make oral presentations are strongly encouraged to prepare posters and submit an abstract. As with oral talks, poster presentations provide a valuable opportunity for scientific interaction. Abstracts must be submitted electronically. Detailed instructions are provided below. Be sure to follow them carefully to ensure that your abstract submission is received and recorded.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION IS CLOSED.

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Tentative Agenda

l Update (11/30) of FINAL CONFERENCE AGENDA --  Adobe PDF format

NOTE: The a pre-conference benefit golf tournament, scheduled for Sunday, December 5th, 2004 has been cancelled.

Sunday, December 5, 2004
PM
 
Registration Office Open
  Authors to set up poster displays
  Early Bird Networking Social

Monday, December 6, 2004
AM
 
Registration
PM
 
Opening Plenary Session
  Welcome Reception

Tuesday, December 7, 2004
AM
 
Registration
  Plenary Session/Concurrent Sessions
  Boxed Lunch Provided
PM
 
Concurrent Sessions
  Formal Poster Session & Networking Reception in Poster Display Area

Wednesday, December 8, 2004
AM
 
Registration
  Plenary Session/Concurrent Sessions
PM
 
Concurrent Sessions
  Best Practices (BP) Workshop -- 3:30-5:00PM -- Open to all participants.
                                                      Registration is not required. Click Here for  more information.
  Evening on Own

Thursday, December 9, 2004
AM
 
Registration
  Concurrent Sessions
  Boxed Lunch Provided
PM
 
Plenary Session/Concurrent Sessions
  Formal Poster Session & Networking Reception in Poster Display Area

Friday, December 10, 2004
AM
 Adaptive Management Workshop
  Concurrent Sessions
PM
 
Conference Concludes, poster presenters dismantle displays
 


NOTE: There will be mid-morning and afternoon refreshment breaks each day.

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Poster Directory

l Update (11/30) of FINAL POSTER DIRECTORY  --  Adobe PDF format

NOTE: Presenting authors appear in Bold. Poster number is listed to the left of the poster title.

Session 1 – Tuesday, December 7, 2004

- On display from 5pm Sunday through 7pm Tuesday, with a formal poster session and reception on Tuesday from 5pm-7pm.

Poster No.

1-84 -- Restoration of Riverine Wetlands: A Long Term Case Study on the Flint River, Georgia – Bart Baca, CSA South. Inc., Wetlands, Dania Beach, FL

1-02 -- Ecological Benefit and Impact Analyses of Alternative Plans for the North Palm Beach Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project: A Procedural Approach for Restoration Planning – Pinar Balci, Ecology and Environment Inc., West Palm Beach, FL

1-69 -- Detecting Trends in Water Temperatures in the Lower Klamath River, California – John Bartholow, US Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, Fort Collins, CO

1-79 -- Quantifying the Effect of Dam Removal on Water Temperatures in the Lower Klamath River, California, and Implications for Salmon Recovery – John Bartholow, US Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, Fort Collins, CO

1-03 -- Southwest Florida Coastal Conservation Corridor Plan – James Beever, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Habitat Conservation Scientific Services, Punta Gorda, FL

1-59 -- Jamaica Bay Marsh Island Ecosystem Restoration - Pilot Program Study – Brett Berkley, MATRIX Environmental & Geotechnical Services, Inc., Ecological Services, East Hanover, NJ

1-30 -- Putting Fish Back Into Fish Creek: Creek Restoration in Urban Anchorage – Daniel Billman, HDR, Engineering, Anchorage, AL

1-04 -- An Agency Approach to Watershed Enhancement: Learning from the Past and Planning for the Future – James Borawa, N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, Division of Inland Fisheries, Asheville, NC

1-85 -- New Technology for Restoration of Sediment-Impacted Streams – David Braatz, Streamside Systems, LLC, Findlay, OH

1-23 -- Synthesis of Land Use Data for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed – Sara Brandt, Chesapeake Research Consortium, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Annapolis, MD

1-86 -- A Study of Minimum Flows and Levels (MFLs) With Regard to Water Quality Protection and Restoration in the St. Johns River Water Management District – John Brawley, Battelle, Coastal Resource and Environmental Management, Duxbury, MA

1-05 -- Evaluation of Everglades Agricultural Area Storage Reservoirs Using Regional Modeling – Lehar Brion, South Florida Water Management District, Office of Modeling, West Palm Beach, FL

1-70 -- Application of a Decision Support System Model for Drought Management Analysis in a Western River System – Sharon G. Campbell, US Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, Fort Collins, CO

1-60 -- Sheldon Marsh Environmental Restoration (Section 227) Project – Shanon Chader, US Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY

1-26 -- Application of SeaWiFS and MODIS Imagery in Monitoring Water Quality of Chesapeake Bay – Zhiqiang Chen, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL

1-24 -- Assessing Urban Land Cover Change in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (1990 - 2000) – Peter Claggett, US Geological Survey, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Annapolis, MD

1-06 -- “Fine Tuning Everglades Restoration”: The Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA) Project – Eric Cline, Iowa State University, Botany, West Palm Beach, FL and South Florida Water Management District

1-21 -- Using Historic Photography as a Resource for Ecological Restoration of the Florida Everglades: the 1940s Photoset and Geodatabase Development – Alisa Coffin, US Geological Survey, FISC, Gainesville, FL

1-31 -- Towards a Healthy Steelhead Population with Watershed Restoration in Washington’s Wind River – Patrick Connolly, US Geological Survey, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA

1-07 -- Structural vs. Functional Measures in Restoration Projects – Ryan C. Davis, Exponent, Albany, NY

1-36 -- Planning for Mixed Seeding Restoration on Xeric Uplands in Florida – Linda Duever, Conway Conservation, Micanopy, FL

1-75 -- Aiding Rio Grande Restoration by Using Stable Isotope Analyses to Characterizing the Past and Present Condition of the River Food Web – Melanie S. Edwards, University of New Mexico, Department of Biology, Albuquerque, NM

1-67 -- Prioritizing Flood Protection while Restoring Ecological Function in Urban Rivers – Theodore Endreny, SUNY ESF, Ecological Engineering, Syracuse, NY

1-22 -- Enhancing Restoration Through Conservation -- Using the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Resource Lands Assessment to Prioritize Land Protection – Andrew Fitch, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Bay Program, Annapolis, MD

1-27 -- Wetland Enhancement Decision-Making Tools & Training for Landowners and Technical Service Providers – Mitch Flinchum, University of Florida/IFAS, IFAS Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL

1-80 -- Restoration of Western River Ecosystems: Reality or Rigormortis? – Marshall Flug, US Geological Survey, DOI/BRD, Fort Collins, CO

1-81 -- Spatial and Temporal Changes in the Vegetation Community Structure Along the Harney River, Florida – Ann Foster, US Geological Survey, FISC, Gainesville, FL

1-33 -- Vic Fazio Yolo Wildlife Area: A Lessons Learned Overview of the Largest Wetland Ecosystem Restoration Project in the Western United States – Miki Fujitsubo, US Army Corps of Engineers, Planning Division, Sacramento, CA

1-66 -- Oak Scrub Restoration at Hilochee Wildlife Management Area: A Preliminary Assessment – Cyndi Gates, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Terrestrial Habitat Conservation and Restoration, Clermont, FL

1-72 -- Conceptual Restoration Designs of Riparian Habitat in the Lower Cuyahoga River, Ohio, for Larval Fish – Michael Greer, US Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY

1-34 -- Wetland and Wildlife Habitat Creation at Opportunity Ponds – Grant Gurnee, Walsh Environmental, Ecological Restoration Group, Boulder, CO

1-57 -- The Impact and Recovery of Ice Roads and Ice Pads on Tundra Ecosystems, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPR-A) – Scott Guyer, Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, Anchorage, Alaksa

1-87 -- Illinois River Basin Ecosystem Restoration – Karen Hagerty, US Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island District, Economic & Environmental Analysis Branch, Rock Island, IL

1-88 -- Ecosystem Restoration in the Upper Chariton River/Rathbun Lake Watershed – Valerie Hansen, US Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District, Kansas City, MO

1-89 -- Restoring the Resacas of the Rio Grande River: Water Quality, Hydrology, and Biodiversity – Jim Henderson, US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Ctr., Vicksburg, MS

1-01 -- The South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) System – Heather Henkel, US Geological Survey, Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies, St. Petersburg, FL

1-25 -- Segmentation and Land Use in the Phase 5 Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model – Kate Hopkins, UMCES/CBPO, Modeling Team, Annapolis, MD

1-08 -- Integrating Environmental Decision Making into a Framework for Farm Policy – Glenda Humiston, University of California, Berkeley, Society and Environment, Richmond, CA

1-82 -- Riparian and Wetland Restoration Projects in the US Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District – Ondrea Hummel, US Army Corps of Engineers, Environmental Resources Section, Albuquerque, NM

1-73 -- Section 206: Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration of Big Escambia Creek, Alabama and Florida – Jenny Jacobson, US Army Corps of Engineers, Planning & Environmental Division, Mobile, AL

1-90 -- Monitoring Evaluation of North Carolina Stream Restoration Projects – Greg Jennings, North Carolina State University, Biological & Agricultural Engineering, Raleigh, NC

1-83 -- Riparian Forest Restoration Project – Rachel Jolley, School of Forestry & WLSC, Auburn University, Auburn, AL

1-55 -- A Multidisciplinary Assessment of the Effect of the Restoration of a More Natural Hydrologic Regime on the Large Lakes of Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota – Larry Kallemeyn, US Geological Survey, Biological Division, International Falls, MN

1-09 -- Cargill's Adaptive Management Approach to Restoration – Parker Keen, Cargill Crop Nutrition, Land Management, Riverview, FL

1-91 -- Redefining the San Antonio Channel Improvement Project to Include Environmental Restoration – Charissa Kelly, US Army Corps of Engineers, Planning, Environmental, Regulatory Branch, Fort Worth, TX

1-71 -- Green River Lake, KY – Modifying Reservoir Regulation and Operation – Richard Kessler, The Nature Conservancy, Kentucky Chapter, Campbellsville, KY

1-48 -- Preliminary Hydrodynamic Modeling of Capitol Lake and the Deschutes River Estuary to Support Restoration Feasibility Assessment – Tarang Khangaonkar, Battelle Seattle Research Center, Water Resources, Seattle, WA

1-32 -- Enhancing the Quantification of Fish and Wildlife Habitat Gains in the Great Lakes’ Areas of Concern Through the Broader Use of Habitat Evaluation Procedures – Bruce Kirschner, International Joint Commission, Great Lakes Regional Office, Windsor, Ontario

1-40 -- Visual_HEA: Habitat Equivalency Analysis Software – Kevin Kohler, NSU Oceanographic Center, National Coral Reef Institute, Dania Beach, FL

1-49 -- The Feasibility of Marsh Restoration and Connectivity in the New Jersey Hackensack Meadowlands – Mark Laska, Great Eastern Ecology, Inc., New York, NY

1-50 -- Restoration Program Assessment for the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) – Mark Laska, Great Eastern Ecology, Inc., New York, NY

1-51 -- Restoring Tidal Influences to a Historically Impounded System in Westchester County, New York – Mark Laska, Great Eastern Ecology, Inc., New York, NY

1-68 -- Designing for Ecology and Community: Restoring the Neglected Spaces Enmeshed in Florida's Urban Sprawl – Dianne Lennon, Restoration Partners, Inc., Environmental Planning and Design, Jupiter, FL

1-78 -- Urban Watershed Restoration in the Lower Bronx River, New York: Unique Challenges, Partnerships, and Technologies – Cecelia Linder, NOAA, Restoration Center, Silver Spring, MD

1-58 -- Current Loxahatchee Watershed Restoration Activities - Martin County, Florida – Kimball Love, Martin County, Office of Water Quality, Stuart, FL

1-45 -- The NOAA Community-based Habitat Restoration Program: Partnerships for Success – Daphne Macfarlan, NOAA Fisheries, Restoration Center, St. Petersburg, FL

1-46 -- Hydrologic Restoration on Florida’s Gulf Coast: An Examination of the Process – Daphne Macfarlan, NOAA Fisheries, Restoration Center, St. Petersburg, FL

1-10 -- Effective Communication of Scientific Information: A Case Study in Adaptive Management – Jana Machula, California Bay Delta Authority, CALFED Science Program, Sacramento, CA

1-11 -- Community Partnering and Educational Outreach Have Made Ten Mile Creek More Than Just A Restoration – Doris Marlin, US Army Corps of Engineers, DP-I, Jacksonville, FL

1-43 -- Population Decline of the Federally Endangered Snail Kite in Florida – Julien Martin, University of Florida, Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Gainesville, FL

1-37 -- Restoration of Sod Pastures to Native Vegetation at The Disney Wilderness Preserve – Chris Matson, The Nature Conservancy, The Disney Wilderness Preserve, Kissimmee, FL

1-62 -- FIU-Singeltary Restoration Project – John Meeder, Florida International University, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL

1-12 -- Setting Interim Goals and Interim Targets for the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan – Carol Mitchell, Everglades National Park, South Florida Ecosystem Office, Homestead, FL

1-56 -- Economic Impact Survey of Eurasian Watermilfoil Removal from Houghton Lake – Mark Mongin, SePRO, Aquatic Specialty Business, Carmel, IN

1-38 -- Wildlife Utilization of Phosphate Mined Lands – Robin Moore, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL

1-63 -- Cat Island Chain Restoration, Green Bay – Rob Nairn, Baird & Associates, Oakville, Ontario

1-77 -- Restoration of Longleaf Pine Sandhill and Flatwoods in a City Park in North-Central Florida: A Progress Report – Geoffrey Parks, City of Gainesville, Nature Operations Division, Gainesville, FL

1-28 -- Decision Models and Directions for the South West Florida Feasibility Study – Leonard Pearlstine, University of Florida, Ft Lauderdale Research & Education Center, Davie, FL

1-29 -- Integrating Urban Growth Models and Habitat Models for Ecological Evaluation of Landscape Impacts – Leonard Pearlstine, University of Florida, Ft Lauderdale Research and Education Center, Davie, FL

1-13 -- The Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project: Planning the Restoration of a South Florida Estuary – Patrick Pitts, US Fish and Wildlife Service, South Florida Ecological Services Office, Vero Beach, FL

1-41 -- The Use of Community Metrics and Health Indices to Monitor the Health of Restored Ecosystems and the Use of Adaptive Management Strategies to Promote Future Success – John Roebig, Lawler Matusky & Skelly Engineers LLP, New York, NY

1-14 -- Federal Policy Issues in Large-Scale Ecosystem Restoration Initiatives – Pervaze Sheikh, Congressional Research Service, Resources, Science, and Industry Division, Washington, DC

1-15 -- Development of a Conceptual Model for the Potomac Watershed – Stacey Sloan-Blersch, US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, Baltimore, MD

1-16 -- Managing Lake Shorelines: How Do We Put It All Back Together? (Restoration of Aquatic Vegetation in Lakes and Reservoirs) – Michael Smart, US Army Corps of Engineers, Lewisville Aquatic Ecosystem Research Facility, Lewisville, TX

1-52 -- Primary Dune Species of Barrier Islands (e.g. Amaranthus pumilus) and the Impact of Increasing Episodic, Extreme Stress Events Linked to Global Change – Allison G. Snow, Wake Forest University, Department of Biology, Winston-Salem, NC

1-61 -- Establishment of Poplar Island: A Large Marsh Restoration Project in Chesapeake Bay – Court Stevenson, University of  Maryland, Center of Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD

1-17 -- Partnering for Success in Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Research, Restoration, and Education in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed – Rebecca Thur, Chesapeake Research Consortium, Freshwater SAV Partnership, Edgewater, MD

1-18 -- Confronting Social Impediments to Adaptive Management, Lessons from the Grand Canyon Ecosystem – Christopher Updike, Northern Arizona University, Center for Sustainable Environments, Flagstaff, AZ

1-19 -- From Design to Maintenance: Case Studies in Adaptive Management for Restoration Success – Ron Van Fleet, Sarasota County, Public Works/Permitting, Mitigation and Restoration, Sarasota, FL

1-64 -- Recharging the Edwards - Cibolo Creek, Texas, Watershed Study – Marie Vanderpool, US Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District, Hydrology and Hydraulics, Fort Worth, TX

1-20 -- National Ecosystem Center of Expertise (ECO-CX) – David Vigh, US Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division, Vicksburg, MS

1-39 -- A Multi-Criteria, GIS Tool for Evaluation of Impacts to Fish and Wildlife When Planning Large Ecosystem Restoration Projects – Les Vilchek, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services, Vero Beach, FL

1-65 -- Bird Island Field Pipeline Removal – Kleberg County, Texas – Catherine R. Villarreal, Shiner Moseley and Associates, Inc., Corpus Christi, TX

1-35 -- New Ecosystem Modeling Service Suite for Regional Ecosystem Restoration – Dali Wang, The Institute for Environmental Modeling, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

1-42 -- EXHEP: Expert Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Software – Antisa Webb, US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research Development Center, Environmental Lab, Vicksburg, MS

1-47 -- Setting a New SAV Restoration Goal for the Chesapeake Bay by Analyzing the Historical Record – Howard Weinberg, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Bay Program, Annapolis, MD

1-53 -- Planning, Design, and Construction of a Tidal Wetland Restoration Project In a Highly Urbanized Estuary, Woodbridge, NJ – Craig A. Woolcott, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), NOAA Restoration Center, Highlands, NJ

1-76 -- The Proposed Panama City – Bay County International Airport Relocation: Wetland Permitting and Mitigation Aspects – Scott Zengel, PBS&J, North Florida Environmental Services, Tallahassee, FL


Session 2 – Thursday, December 9, 2004

- On display from 7am Wednesday through 12noon Friday, with a formal poster session and reception on Thursday from 5pm-7pm.

Poster No.

2-55 -- Enhanced Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA): Innovative Remedial Strategy for Sustainable Ecosystem Restoration? – Marshall Allen, Florida International University, Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology, Miami, FL

2-56 -- The US Geological Survey Integrated Hydrologic Monitoring of the Florida's Southwest Coast and Florida Bay: Importance to CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan Performance Measures – Gordon Anderson, US Geological Survey, FISC-WRS, Homestead, FL

2-57 -- Monitoring the Hydrodynamics of the Everglades Mangrove Transitional Zone: Getting the Water Right at the Ecological Ecotone – Gordon Anderson, US Geological Survey, FISC-WRS, Homestead, FL

2-84 -- Pilot Study to Quantify Floodplain Soil Phosphorus in the Kissimmee River Restoration Area – Carmen Baez-Smith, South Florida Water Management District, Kissimmee Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2-45 -- Assessing the Effect of Hydrophilic Soil Amendments on Riparian Plant Growth and Survival in Western Texas – Pamela Bailey, US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS

2-102 -- Use of an Amphibian IBI to Evaluate Success of Constructed Wetlands – Joe Bartoszek, Ohio EPA, DSW/WQ, Dayton, OH

2-117 -- Information Scale, Reporting, and Assessment: Performance Measures for Biscayne Bay Fish Communities – Sarah Bellmund, Biscayne National Park, Resource Management, Homestead, FL

2-46 -- Mercury in Mosquitofish: Assessing the Influences of Bioaccumulation and Bioavailability – Bryan Bemis, US Geological Survey, Water Resources, Menlo Park, CA

2-01 -- Biscayne Bay Hydrodynamic Data Collection – Lee Anne Bledsoe, Biscayne National Park, Resource Managment, Homestead, FL

2-41 -- A Formidable Challenge to Everglades Restoration – Controlling Old World Climbing Fern – Laura Brandt, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Senior Wildlife Biologist for A.R.M. Loxahatchee NWR, Boynton Beach, FL

2-120 -- GIS Data Development of Fire History for Everglades National Park from 1948 to 1979 – Kristy Capobianco, US Geological Survey, FISC, Gainesville, FL

2-23 -- A Summary of Baseline Vegetation Data for Phase I of the Kissimmee River Restoration Project and Expectations for Wetland Vegetation Recovery in the Restored System – Laura Carnal, South Florida Water Management District, Kissimmee Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2-26 -- Management Recommendations for Exotic and Nuisance Plant Species Control in a Disturbed Maritime Hammock Community – Michelle Carte, Florida Institute of Technology, Marine and Environmental Systems, Jacksonville, FL

2-32 -- Adapting Restoration to Disturbance: Wildfire Impacts on Wetland and Upland Restoration and Invasive Exotic Control – Mary Kay Cassani, Florida Gulf Coast University, College of Arts and Sciences, Ft. Myers, FL

2-89 -- The Roles of American Alligators and American Crocodiles as Indicators of Environmental Change – Michael Cherkiss, University of Florida, FLREC, Davie, FL

2-31 -- A Biological Control Agent for Invasive Plant Species, Old World Climbing Fern (Lygodium microphyllum) – Tainya Clarke, Florida International University, Environmental Studies, Miami, FL

2-60 -- Verification of ATLSS SESI Models Using Species Abundance Data – Jane Comiskey, The Institute for Environmental Modeling, Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Knoxville, TN

2-103 -- Pyrite Oxidation in Dredged Estuarine Sediments: Challenges for Beneficial Use – Jeffrey Cornwell, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD

2-35 -- Conceptual Model for an Ecologically Based Management Plan for Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius, in Florida – James Cuda, University of Florida/IFAS, Entomology & Nematology, Gainesville, FL

2-104 -- The Impact of Stream Nutrient Loading on Filamentous Green Algae in Conesus Lake and the Use of Continuous Flow-Through Incubation Chambers for Measurement In Situ of Changes in Biomass – Peter D'Aiuto, SUNY Brockport, Environmental Science and Biology, Altamonte Springs, FL

2-90 -- The Potential Utility of Apple Snail Egg Clusters in the Context of Ecological Performance Measures – Philip Darby, University of West Florida, Biology, Pensacola, FL

2-33 -- Specific Conductance in the Everglades Agricultural Area – Samira Daroub, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL

2-11 -- The Results of Monitoring Hard Corals Restored after the Installation of Telecommunication Cables off South Florida – Donald Deis, PBS&J, Environmental, Jacksonville, FL

2-42 -- Transport of Dissolved and Particulate Phosphorus in Canal Waters Downstream of STA-1W – Orlando Diaz, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL

2-79 -- Effect of Scaling on Hydraulic Conductivity in a Karst Aquifer – Vincent J. DiFrenna, Florida International University, Earth Sciences, Miami, FL

2-105 -- The Response of Below and Aboveground Biomass of Typha to Harvesting: A Modelling Approach – Hai Dinh Ngoc, Saitama university, Department of Environmental Science and Human Engineering, Saitama, Saitama

2-47 -- Chlorophyll a as an Indicator of Eutrophication in the Caloosahatchee Estuary and San Carlos Bay, Florida – Peter Doering, South Florida Water Management District, Coastal Ecosystems Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2-48 -- Phosphorus Release and Retention by Soils of Natural Isolated Wetlands in Okeechobee Basin, Florida – Ed Dunne, University of Florida, Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory, Gainesville, FL

2-94 -- Fish Assemblages as an Indicator of Biological Function in Aquatic Systems Restored after Phosphate Mining – Douglas Durbin, Biological Research Associates, Water Resources, Tampa, FL

2-49 -- Mercury Bioaccumulation Responses to Everglades Restoration – David Evans, NOAA, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, NC

2-38 -- Submergence and Salinity Effects on Decomposition of Wetland Plants; Exotic: Purple Loosestrife - Lythrum salicaria versus Native: Cattail - Typha sp. – Laurence Fernberg, Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., Ecorestoration, White Plains, NY

2-43 -- Periphyton Stormwater Treatment Areas: Results of Increased Velocity and Increased Water Depths on Phosphorus Removal Efficiency – Erin Fogarty-Kellis, South Florida Water Management District, Everglades, West Palm Beach, FL

2-12 -- The Use of Otolith Microchemistry to Monitor and Evaluate the Movement of Coral Reef Fish in South Florida Waters – Trika Gerard, NOAA SE Fisheries/FAMU, Larval Fish Ecology, Miami, FL

2-71 -- Evaluation of Regional Models for Evapotranspiration in the Everglades – Edward German, US Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Altamonte Springs, FL

2-86 -- Use of a Modified Macrohabitat Guild Structure for Assessing Fish Dependence on Off-Channel Habitats in the Kissimmee River – Lawrence Glenn, South Florida Water Management District, Kissimmee Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2-106 -- Physiological Effects of Crude Oil and Brine on Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda) – Dean Goodin, Shaw Environmental, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA

2-107 -- Seed Germination in Wild Celery, Vallisneria americana Michx. from Lake Okeechobee, Florida U.S.A. – Herbert Grimshaw, South Florida Water Management District, Okeechobee Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2-20 -- Ecosystem Restoration, Coastal Erosion Protection, and Recreational Amenities using Artificial Reef Submerged Breakwaters and Coral Propagation Techniques – Lee Harris, Florida Tech, Marine & Environmental Systems, Melbourne, FL

2-91 -- Predicting Wildlife Population Responses by Making Comparisons across a Species’ Range: A Case Study between Mangrove and Salt Marsh Diamondback Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) – Kristen Hart, Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, NC

2-59 -- ATLSS Data Viewer: A Tool to Analyze and Display ATLSS Model Outputs – Steve Hartley, US Geological Survey, National Wetlands Research Center, Lafayette, LA

2-50 -- Influence of the Form of Dissolved Nitrogen Inputs on Phytoplankton Community Composition in Florida Bay and the Southwestern Florida Shelf – Cynthia Heil, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Water Research Institute,
St. Petersburg, FL

2-58 -- Using an Integrated Hydrologic Monitoring Network as a Tool to Analyze Everglades Ecosystem Response during CERP Implementation – Clinton Hittle, US Geological Survey, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Miami, FL

2-65 -- Measuring the Influence of Water Management Infiltration Basins on Water Quality in Neighboring Marshes in Everglades National Park using Midge Bioassessment Methods – Richard Jacobsen, Everglades National Park, South Florida Natural Resources Center, Homestead, FL

2-84 -- Development of Invertebrate Performance Measures for Everglades Hydrological Restoration: Chironomid – Hydroperiod Relationships in Everglades National Park – Richard Jacobsen, Everglades National Park, South Florida Natural Resources Center, Homestead, FL

2-82 -- Monitoring the Extremes: How a Comprehensive Monitoring and Analysis Program Captured the Affects of Drastically Different Weather in 2002 and 2003 on Chesapeake Bay – David Jasinski, Chesapeakebay Program Office, Monitoring, Annapolis, MD

2-80 -- Computational Challenges in South Florida Watershed Modeling for Ecosystem Restoration – Hsin-Chi Jerry Lin, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS

2-24 -- Long-Term Management of the Kissimmee Chain of Lakes, Florida – Brad Jones, South Florida Water Management District, Kissimmee Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2-61 -- Characterizing Important Spatial Scale Lengths of Florida Everglades Vegetation for Hydrologic Model Parameterization and Restoration Monitoring – John Jones, US Geological Survey, Eastern Region Geography, Reston, VA

2-121 -- Relating Water Depth, Hydroperiod, and Flows with Elevation Differences in the Everglades Ridge and Slough Community – Eric Jorczak, University of Florida, Soil and Water Science, Gainesville, FL

2-75 -- Nekton Habitat Use and Responses to Wetland Restoration in the Mississippi River Delta – Frank Jordan, Loyola University New Orleans, Biological Sciences, New Orleans, LA

2-111 -- Characterization and Selection of Uniola Paniculata L. Genotypes for Enhanced Dune Restoration – Mike Kane, University of Florida/IFAS, Environmental Horticulture/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

2-51 -- Effects of Canal-Water Intrusion on C and N Biogeochemistry and Isotopes at the A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge – Carol Kendall, U. S. Geological Survey, WRD, Menlo Park, CA

2-81 -- Estimating Missing Rainfalls in South Florida Using Neural Networks-Based Classification – Tae-Woong Kim, National Park Service, South Florida Ecosystem Office, Homestead, FL

2-29 -- Fish Introductions into Everglades Wetlands: An Unforeseen Consequence of Restoration – Jeffrey Kline, Everglades National Park, South Florida Natural Resources Center, Homestead, FL

2-87 -- Habitat Use by Wetland Fish Assemblages: Establishing Baseline Community Conditions for Wetland Restoration in Tampa Bay, Florida – Justin Krebs, US Geological Survey, St Petersburg, FL

2-99 -- A New Aerial Survey Method to Monitor the Response of Manatees to Restoration of the Florida Everglades – Catherine Langtimm, US Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Gainesville, FL

2-68 -- Modeling the Water Flow of the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetland Watershed System for Ecosystem Restoration – Hsin-Chi Jerry Lin, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS

2-02 -- Success and Limits of a Marine Protected Area: the Blue Crab in Chesapeake Bay – Rom Lipcius, College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA

2-95 -- Can Restoration Change the Role of Everglades Karst Holes as Sinks for Aquatic Animals? – William Loftus, US Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Homestead, FL

2-96 -- Between the Rock and a Wet Place: Restoration of the Rocky Glades – William Loftus, US Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Homestead, FL

2-17 -- Establishing Baseline Data for Mangrove Forest Fishes in the Everglades: How Important is Hydrology? – Carole McIvor, US Geological Survey, Center for Coastal & Watershed Studies, St Petersburg, FL

2-122 -- Phosphorus Estimation in Isolated Wetlands of Lake Okeechobee Sub-basins using GIS, Remote Sensing and Classification Trees – Kathleen McKee, University of Florida, Soil and Water Science, Gainesville, FL

2-52 -- Water Quality in South Florida’s Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge ---Trends and Spatial Characteristics of Selected Constituents – Benjamin McPherson, US Geological Survey, WRD, Tampa, FL

2-16 -- Freshwater Discharge Required to Re-Establish Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands and Nearshore Estuarine Zone – John Meeder, Florida International University, SERC, Miami, FL

2-123 -- Assessment of Soil Salinity and Moisture Fluctuations in the Bald Cypress Floodplains of the Loxahatchee River Watershed – Amanda Mortl, University of Florida, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Homestead, FL

2-97 -- Age and Growth of Florida Gar, a Top Predatory Fish in Southern Florida – Debra Murie, University of Florida, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Gainesville, FL

2-78 -- Hydrology, Ecology, and Simulation of the Six Mile Cypress/Ten Mile Canal Watershed System – John Murray, Florida Gulf Coast University, Computer Science, Fort Myers, Florida

2-112 -- Habitat Requirements of Three Species and Their Responses to Translocation to Reclaimed Phosphate Mined Land – Henry R. Mushinsky, University of South Florida, Department of Biology, Tampa, FL

2-113 -- Cottonwood Management and Regeneration along the Missouri River – Kristine Nemec, US Army Corps of Engineers, Planning Branch, Omaha, NE

2-124 -- Historic Changes in the Everglades Ridge and Slough Patterned Landscape – Martha Nungesser, South Florida Water Management District, Everglades Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2-40 -- Determining the Condition of Northern Everglades Tree Islands Impacted by Hydrology and Invasive Exotic Species – Pamela Pannozzo, University of Florida, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Ft. Lauderdale, FL

2-39 -- Hydrologic Changes Following Removal of Invasive Plants at Prairie Creek, Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie – Geoffrey Parish, Graef, Anhalt, Schloemer & Associates, Environmental Division, Milwaukee, WI

2-77 -- Modeling Hydrologic Events in a Post-Wildfire Watershed Restoration Environment Using the MIKE-SHE Model – Boris Poff, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Flagstaff, AZ

2-25 -- Restoration of Floodplain Marsh Along the St. Johns River in Brevard County, Florida – Kimberli Ponzio, St. Johns River Water Management District, Water Resources, Palatka, FL

2-03 -- Using Natural Chemical Tracers to Evaluate Point-source and Non-Point Sources of Freshwater Inputs to Biscayne Bay – Rene Price, Florida International University, SERC and Earth Sciences, Miami, FL

2-19 -- Mitigation of a S.E. Florida USA Coral Reef Damaged by the Grounding of a Nuclear Submarine: Results of a Hypotheses-Based Restoration Study – Patrick Quinn, Oceanographic Center, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL

2-100 -- Are Manatee Over-Wintering Strategies and Restoration Efforts Compatible in the Northwestern Everglades Region? – Jim Reid, US Geological Survey, Center for Aquatic Resource Studies, Sirenia Project, Gainesville, FL

2-30 -- Disturbance: Tree Island Spread v. Exotic Plant Invasion – Amy Renshaw, Florida International University, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL

2-76 -- Habitat Assessment for Hatching American Crocodile in the C-111 Wetland Basin and Florida Bay Wildlife Protection Area Based on Monthly Salinity Contouring Analysis from 1996 to 2003 – Amanda Rice, US Geological Survey, FISC-WRS, Homestead, FL

2-93 -- Use of Amphibian Communities as Indicators of Restoration Success in the Everglades – Amanda Rice, US Geological Survey, NA, Homestead, FL

2-125 -- Application of Soil Mapping and Modeling Efforts in WCA-2 Integrating GIS, Geostatistics and Remote Sensing Techniques – Rosanna Rivero, University of Florida, Department of Soil and Water Science/Urban and Regional Planning, Gainesville, FL

2-44 -- History of Phosphorus Accumulation in Soils along a Nutrient Gradient in Water Conservation Area 2A, South Florida – John Robbins, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI

2-04 -- Habitat Relationships of Fish and Shrimp in Southern Biscayne Bay – Michael Robblee, US Geologial Survey, c/o Everglades National Park, South Florida Natural Resources Center, Homestead, FL

2-34 -- Quantifying the Effects of Nutrient Reduction on Growth Rates of Phytoplankton in Kings Bay, Florida – Darlene Saindon, University of Florida, Dept. of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Gainesville, FL

2-108 -- Modeling the Effect of Soil Amendments (Composts) on Water Balance and Water Quality – Reza Savabi, USDA-ARS, SHRS, Everglades AGro-Hydrology Proj, Miami, FL

2-05 -- Aspects of Oyster Ecology and Their Utility in the Design of Estuarine Restoration Projects in the Greater Everglades: Example from Southern Golden Gate Estates – Michael Savarese, Florida Gulf Coast University, Coastal Watershed Institute, Fort Myers, FL

2-73 -- Sheet Flow Velocity in Everglades National Park, Florida – Raymond Schaffranek, US Geological Survey, WRD/NRP, Reston, VA

2-83 -- Model for Simulation of Surface-Water Flow and Transport through Freshwater-Wetland and Coastal-Marine Ecosystems in Everglades National Park, Florida – Raymond Schaffranek, US Geological Survey, WRD/NRP, Reston, VA

2-109 -- Restoration of the Florida Mouse to Native and Reclaimed Mined Sites: Assessing Habitat Quality to Improve Translocation Success – Dan Schmutz, Berryman & Henigar, Water Resources & Environmental Sciences, Orlando, FL

2-06 -- Oyster Reef Restoration – Bruce Schwenneker, Malcolm Pirnie, Newport News, VA

2-36 -- Linkage Between Microbial Metabolic Diversity and Restoration Age in the Hole-in-the-Donut, Everglades National Park – Kanika Sharma, University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department, Gainesville, FL

2-28 -- Natural Plant Pathogens of Brazilian Pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi) in the Everglades National Park: Potential for Biological Control – Kateel G. Shetty, Department of Environmental Studies and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL

2-18 -- Techniques for Restoring Gorgonians to Coral Reef Injury Areas – Lauren Shuman, National Coral Reef Institute, Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center, Dania Beach, FL

2-66 -- Unraveling Trophic Interactions Between the Periphyton Mat Complex and Consumers in the Florida Everglades – Shawn Smith, Florida International University, Department of Biological Sciences, Miami, FL

2-13 -- Influence of Porewater Salinity and Nutrients on Seedling Recruitment of Mangroves and Invasive Exotic Plants across a Mangrove - Marsh Ecotone on the Harney River, Everglades National Park – Thomas Smith III, US Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Saint Petersburg, FL

2-14 -- Trajectories of Mangrove Forest Recovery in the Southwest Everglades a Decade Following Hurricane Andrew: Variable Patterns of Recruitment, Growth, and Mortality – Thomas Smith III, US Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Saint Petersburg, FL

2-126 -- Response of Muhly Grass to Different Seasons of Prescribed Fire in Southern Florida – Jim Snyder, US Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Ochopee, FL

2-114 -- Spoil Island Renovation – Julia Stack, The Florida Aquarium, Horticulture/Biological Operations, Tampa, FL

2-101 -- Modeling Manatee Response to Hydrologic Restoration in the Ten Thousand Islands and Everglades National Park – Brad Stith, US Geological Survey, Center for Aquatic Resources Studies, Sirenia Project, Gainesville, FL

2-127 -- The Relationship Between Soil Moisture and Nutrient Availability in Tree Islands of Shark Slough, Everglades National Park – Elizabeth Struhar, Florida International University, Environmental Studies, Miami, FL

2-70 -- Effect of Surface Cover on Surface Radiation Balance in the Florida Everglades – David Sumner, U. S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Altamonte Springs, FL

2-62 -- Using a Hydrologic/Ecological Model Linkage to Evaluate the Influence of Ecosystem Restoration on Everglades Fish Population – Eric Swain, US Geological Survey, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Miami, FL

2-115 -- Fast Growing Tree Bridge Crops for Ecological Restoration of Phosphate Mined Lands – Bijay Tamang, University of Florida, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Gainesville, FL

2-116 -- Is Roller Chopping an Alternative Management Practice to Fire in Restoring Dry Prairie? – George Tanner, University of Florida/IFAS, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Gainesville, FL

2-67 -- Benthic Periphyton Recovery and Phosphorus Dynamics upon Artificial Flooding in a Newly Burned Freshwater Marl Prairie (Everglades National Park, FL, USA) – Serge Thomas, SERC/FIU, Periphyton Group, Miami, FL

2-110 -- Permanent Habitat Changes on Cape Sable, Everglades National Park – Ginger Tiling, US Geological Survey, Geology, St. Peterburg, FL

2-98 -- Assessment of American Crocodile Populations of Southern Florida: Trends in Population and Reproduction Rates – William Tucker, MACTEC Engineering and Consulting, Inc., Water Resources, Newberry, FL

2-85 -- The Spatial Distribution and Relative Abundance of Larval Dragonflies (Anisoptera) Found in the Freshwater Marshes of the Florida Everglades – Raul Urgelles, Florida International University, Biological Sciences, Miami, FL

2-07 -- The Role of Oysters, Oyster Reef-Associated Organisms, and Adaptive Resource Management in Setting Water Quality Targets in the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida – Aswani Volety, Florida Gulf Coast University, Ecological and Social Sciences, Fort Myers, FL

2-72 -- The Importance of Flow in Restoring and Maintaining the Ridge-Slough-Tree Island Landscape Pattern in the Florida Everglades – John Volin, Florida Atlantic University, Biological Sciences, Davie, FL

2-08 -- Environmental Alterations in Florida Bay in the Past 3000 Yrs Based on Diatom Assemblages Extracted from Sediment Cores – Anna Wachnicka, Florida International University, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Miami, FL

2-92 -- Threats to Amphibian Populations in South Florida – Hardin Waddle, University of Florida, Florida Co-Op Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, Ochopee, FL

2-53 -- Addressing Data Needs for Ecosystem Management: Enhancing an Existing Long-Term Water Quality Monitoring Network for the Northern Everglades – Mike Waldon, US Fish and Wildlife Service, A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Boynton Beach, FL

2-54 -- Surface Water Quality Monitoring in Everglades, Florida – Qingren Wang, Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida/IFAS, Homestead, FL

2-21 -- Forest Structure and Vital Rates of Mangrove Communities in the Everglades: Implications for Restoration – Greg Ward, Computer Science Corporation, US Geological Survey - Florida Integrated Science Center, Homestead, FL

2-22 -- Growth Curve Estimates of A. germinans, L. racemosa, and R. mangle in Relation to Salinity and Nutrient Gradients Across the Mangrove Intertidal Zone – Greg Ward, Computer Science Corporation, US Geological Survey - Florida Integrated Science Center, Homestead, FL

2-69 -- Changes in Groundwater Influence Soil Surface Elevation in a Mangrove Forest along the Shark River, Everglades National Park – Kevin Whelan, US Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Miami, FL

2-37 -- TAME Melaleuca: An Integrated Pest Management Approach for Control of Melaleuca quinquenervia – M. Scott Wiggers, USDA-ARS, Invasive Plant Research Laboratory, Fort Lauderdale, FL

2-09 -- Recent Changes to an Estuarine-Marine Ecosystem: Using Benthic Foraminiferal Assemblage Data toward a Predictive Model of Ecosystem Change, Central and Southern Biscayne Bay, Florida – Christopher Williams, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Geology Department, Carbondale, IL

2-63 -- Evaluating the Effects of Everglades Restoration Scenarios by Linking the Local-Scale Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS) Model to the Regional South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM) – Melinda Wolfert, US Geological Survey, FISC- Water and Restoration Studies, Miami, FL

2-64 -- Applying the Penman-Monteith Equation in the Everglades to Calculate the Actual Evapotranspiration in Order to Improve Predictions for Restoration Scenarios – Melinda Wolfert, US Geological Survey, FISC- Water and Restoration Studies, Miami, FL

2-88 -- Patterns of Movement of Florida Gar (Lepisosteus platyrhincus) in the Everglades Revealed by Radio Telemetry – Lawrence Wolski, Florida International University, Biological Sciences, Miami, FL

2-15 -- Mangrove Assessments as an Indicator of Restoration Success in Die-Off Areas Located Adjacent to Development – Kathy Worley, The Conservancy of Southwest Florida, Environmental Science, Naples, FL

2-10 -- Modeling Three-Dimensional Coastal Water Quality with a General Paradigm – Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh, University of Central Florida, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Orlando, FL

2-74 -- Nutrients Inputs along Coastal Transects within Everglades National Park, Florida – Mark Zucker, US Geological Survey, Water, Miami, FL

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Adaptive Management Workshop

The Role of Science in Adaptive Management
Friday, December 10, 2004 (8:30am – 1:00pm)
-- SORRY THIS WORKSHOP IS FILLED

The conference will feature a special hands-on workshop on The Role of Science in Adaptive Management. This workshop, which requires pre-registration, will be co- facilitated by Steven Yaffee, Professor of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy and Theodore Roosevelt Chair of Ecosystem Management Natural Resource Policy at the University of Michigan, and Barry Gold, Program Officer of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation (and former Chief of the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center).

Adaptive management "treats management policies and actions as experiments in order to improve management by learning from the ecosystems being affected. Adaptive management links credible science, values, and experience of stakeholders and managers for management decision making." Increasingly, credible, objective science is seen as an important guiding light for decision-making in adaptive management programs.

A review of adaptive management programs suggests that conflicts arise over values, management objectives, and about the science, its objectivity and usefulness. This workshop will explore the role of science in adaptive management, approaches for balancing quality with relevance and issues related to linking science to policy and decision-making. Workshop participants will be provided with a simulation exercise based on real experience gleaned from how a number of large-scale adaptive management programs have addressed these issues. They will engage in role playing to apply some of the concepts and ideas discussed in the previous two days, as well as to share their own insights and past experiences that illustrate concepts and challenges regarding the role of science in adaptive management. Attendees will also participate in role-playing exercises that review scenarios and demonstrate how to address questions around designing a process that helps link science with decision-making.

Based on a course taught at the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Conservation Training Center (NCTC), this workshop is intended to help participants:

  1. Focus on the real world challenges involved in implementing adaptive management at the project level, and build familiarity with a set of strategies for dealing with them;

  2. identify strategies to overcome institutional barriers in order to improve the effectiveness of
    adaptive management efforts; and

  3. foster relationships with other colleagues dealing with adaptive management in added contexts.

ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED:

 -- SORRY THIS WORKSHOP IS FILLED -- Because of the interactive nature of this workshop, attendance is limited to the first 50-registrants, and advance registration is required. Please indicate your interest in participating on the conference registration form. As seating space is limited, should you need to cancel your registration, please notify us no later than 30-days prior to the workshop so that another registrant may fill your seat.

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Post-Conference Field Trips

NOTE: Advanced registration closes at 5:00pm on Tuesday, November 23, 2004. After that time it will be necessary to register onsite at the conference.

The Nature Conservancy’s Disney Wilderness Preserve - $40.00
Friday, December 10, 2004

The Disney Wilderness Preserve is a 12,000-acre Nature Conservancy project located in the pine flatwoods ecosystem of central Florida. It was started in 1992 as an offsite mitigation project for wetland impacts occurring at Walt Disney World Resort, the Orlando International Airport and various small developments in Orlando. The mitigation involves restoring hydrology in over 4,000 acres of wetlands on a former cattle ranch, re-introducing native vegetation in over 1,500 acres of pasture and re-establishing natural processes (primarily fire) throughout the 12,000-acre site. The Nature Conservancy has expanded the mission of the project to include an ecological research program to meet restoration and management information needs in pine flatwoods systems.

Web Site: http://nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/florida/preserves/art5523.html

Friday, December 10, 2004
1:00pm Depart Wyndham
2:00-2:45pm Introduction to Preserve/Presentations Bob Mindick
2:45-4:15pm Narrated Buggy tour
4:15-5:45pm Narrated hiking tour
5:45pm Depart Disney Preserve
6:30pm Arrive Wyndham


Kissimmee River Restoration/Riverwoods/Lockett Estate – $80.00
Saturday
, December 11, 2004

In 1992, Congress authorized the Water Resources Development Act to implement the Kissimmee River Restoration. The restoration project is cost-shared by the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) and US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE). The Riverwoods Field Lab serves as the central staging area for the SFWMD's research and monitoring of the project.

The Kissimmee River Restoration Project will restore the integrity of the river by backfilling the middle third of the river to restore flow and the lost benefits of the original pre-channelized system. The project will restore over 40 square miles of river/floodplain ecosystem including 43 miles of meandering river channel and 27,000 acres of wetlands.

The Riverwoods Field Laboratory (RFL) is a facility jointly managed by the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) and Florida Atlantic University's Center for Environmental Studies (CES). Riverwoods' main mission is to support research and educational activities related to the restoration of the Kissimmee River and the greater Everglades watershed.

Established in 1995, Riverwoods coordinates the activities of research scientists, students, and technicians from state and out-of-state organizations and institutions, including universities, water management districts and other agencies.

Web Site: http://riverwoods.ces.fau.edu/

Saturday, December 11, 2004
6:30-7:00am Morning refreshments
7:00am Depart Wyndham
9:00am Arrival & Introduction to Riverwoods Field Laboratory – Loisa Kerwin
9:15am-12:00pm Narrated Pontoon Boat Tour of the Kissimee River
12:00-1:00pm Catered lunch @ Edna Pierce Lockett Estate – A Florida Pioneer homestead left by the late Edna Pierce Lockett, first woman to become a Florida legislator - a wonderful historical experience
1:00-1:15pm Return to Riverwoods
1:15-4:00pm Hiking @ Hickory Hammock – The three-mile-long Bluff Hammock Trail, part of the Florida National Scenic Trail, runs along the scenic Kissimmee River floodplain across a series of oak and palm hammocks, giving you high points from which to observe waterfowl — sandhill cranes, caracara, herons, and egrets frequent the floodplain. Foxes and bobcats have been spotted along the trail, as well as deer and alligators.
4:00pm Depart Riverwoods
6:00pm Arrive Wyndham


Northern Everglades & Restoration Sites – $125.00
Saturday
, December 11, 2004

Experience the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, the last northernmost portion of the unique Everglades. With over 221 square miles of Everglades habitat, A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is home to the American alligator and the endangered Everglades snail kite. In any given year, as many as 257 species of birds may use the refuge's diverse wetland habitats.
Not quite all of the 147,392 acre refuge is Everglades habitat. A four hundred acre cypress swamp is the largest remaining remnant of a cypress strand that once separated the pine flatwoods in the east from the Everglades marshes. A boardwalk into the swamp gives you a chance for an up-close swamp experience without getting your feet wet.

Web Site: http://loxahatchee.fws.gov/home/default.asp

Everglades restoration is an enormous effort now moving forward through many projects incorporated under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The framework of restoration is built on the assessment and interpretation of performance measures as individual project components unfold.
The Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA) project is now underway in the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge and will assist in developing performance measures for the restoration effort. The project will divide two existing 34-acre impoundments into four 17-acre impoundments with a re-circulating water system that provides tight control over water levels. Each impoundment will be constructed to physically mimic the Everglades landscape, and water depths and flows will be manipulated to induce related responses by wildlife, tree island, and ridge and slough communities. Scientists and engineers will use the project to test restoration plans on a small scale before applying them to the large-scale Everglades ecosystem.

Web Site http://loxahatchee.fws.gov/LILA%20project/index.asp

Saturday
, December 11, 2004
6:30am Morning refreshments
7:00am Depart from Wyndham
10:00am Arrive @ Loxahatchee Wildlife Refuge
10:00-10:30am Overview and introduction to Refuge – Mark Musaus
10:30-11:30am Narrated Airboat rides throughout northern everglades
11:30am-12:30pm Catered lunch at Seminole Indian “chickie” within National Refuge
Walk along boardwalks, explore nature center, etc. on own.
12:45-1:15pm Visit “LILA” project & tree island
1:45-4:00pm Tour Palm Beach Aggregates – an Everglades Restoration Reservoir project.- Enrique Tameo

STA-1West tour – “Storm Water Treatment Area-1 West – one of the largest filtration marshes in the world for Everglades water quality”
4:00pm Depart
7:00pm Arrive Wyndham

Return to Index

Registration Information

What does the Conference & Student Attendee Registration Fee Include? The conference registration fee allows each registrant to receive one copy of the printed abstract book to be distributed at the conference, and one copy on CD-ROM to be mailed post-conference. Registration materials include a canvas briefcase and portfolio to facilitate note taking and attendance at the Sunday Early Bird Networking Social, the Welcome Reception on Monday, and the Tuesday and Thursday evening Poster Session Socials. A boxed lunch will be provided on Tuesday and Thursday, and there will be daily morning, mid-day and afternoon refreshment breaks. The guest and child registration fee includes full attendance at the Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evening functions only. A photocopy of a valid student ID must accompany student registration forms. Post-conference field trips are being offered on an optional basis for an additional charge.

Guest and Child Registration The guest and child registration fee includes full attendance at the Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evening functions only. Family members may sign up for the optional post-conference field trips on-site at the conference for an additional charge if space is available. (Guests do not receive meeting materials.)

MEETING ATTENDEE REGISTRATION FEES

Early Registration (Register and Pay by September 10, 2004)

Conference Attendee Fee

US $265.00

Student Attendee Fee
(Valid Student Identification Required)*

US $175.00

Regular Registration (Register and Pay by October 15, 2004)

Conference Attendee Fee

US $350.00

Student Attendee Fee
(Valid Student Identification Required)*

US $225.00

Late/On-site Registration (Register and Pay after October 15, 2004)

Conference Attendee Fee

US $395.00

Student Attendee Fee
(Valid Student Identification Required)*

US $295.00

*A photocopy of a valid student ID must accompany student registration forms. If you register online, please FAX the student ID form and indicate your registration was submitted online.

PLEASE NOTE: Payment must accompany registration and be received by the dates indicated to qualify for the applicable fee.
 


 

OPTIONAL POST CONFERENCE FIELD TRIPS

 

Each field trip is limited to 40 participants and advance registration is required, so early registration is recommended. If an insufficient number of registrants sign up, field trips are subject to cancellation. If your trip is canceled or full, we will contact you to obtain your second choice. Field trips are open exclusively to conference registrants. However, family members may sign up on-site at the conference if space is available. CLICK HERE to see field trip details and what the FIELD TRIP fees include.

 

FIELD TRIPS

Friday, December 10, 2004 (1:00pm – 6:30pm)

The Nature Conservancy’s Disney Wilderness Preserve

US $ 40.00

Saturday, December 11, 2004 (6:30am – 6:00pm)

Kissimmee River Restoration/Riverwoods/Lockett Estate

US $ 80.00

Saturday, December 11, 2004 (6:30am – 7:00pm)

Northern Everglades & Restoration Sites

US $ 125.00

 


 

GUEST/CHILD REGISTRATION FEES

Early Registration (Register and Pay by September 10, 2004)

Spouse/Guest Fee

US $150.00

Child Fee (12 years old and under)

US $ 75.00

Regular Registration (Register and Pay by October 15, 2004)

Spouse/Guest Fee

US $200.00

Child Fee (12 years old and under)

US $100.00

Late/On-site Registration (Register and Pay after October 15, 2004)

Spouse/Guest Fee

US $200.00

Child Fee (12 years old and under)

US $100.00

 


 

We are delighted you wish to register for the First National  Conference on Ecosystem Restoration. Advanced registration is closed, however, we will be happy to register you onsite at the conference and look forward to your participation.


Registration Confirmation
: An email notice acknowledging we received your online registration submission will be sent within three business days. Please do not contact us to verify we received your online registration before this three-day period has elapsed. Formal written confirmation and a hard copy of your receipt will be mailed to you within three weeks of receiving your completed registration form and appropriate payment.

 

Refund Policy: Requests for refunds will be honored if the UF/IFAS Office of Conferences & Institutes receives a written notification of cancellation by November 1, 2004. A processing fee of $ 75.00 will be deducted from all conference registration refunds. A $15.00 fee will be deducted from all field trip refunds. A $25.00 fee will be deducted from all Spouse/Guest fee registration refunds. No refunds will be honored for cancellations after November 1, 2004.

 

Special Needs: Special needs (such as visual, hearing or walking impairments) of registered participants can be reasonably accommodated if they contact the the Office of Conferences & Institutes, no later than 10 working days prior to the conference. We can be reached by phone at 1-352-392-5930, by fax at 1-352-392-9734, or by email at: bmiller-tipton@ifas.ufl.edu. If calling from within the State of Florida, the office can be reached at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). 

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Display Space Available

Display reservations are closed.

The conference will feature an excellent opportunity for organizations to display educational and informative materials to a broad range of participants involved in ecosystem restoration. Display space is limited and will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. The deadline to register for display space is November 1st, or, once display space is no longer available.

There are three options of Display Space available:

1.) A Display Booth is $1,500 and includes a 10' deep x 10' wide display area, a skirted 6’ table, two chairs, pipe and drape, a wastebasket, and an identification sign showing company name.

2.) Space for a Freestanding Display is $750 and includes a 3’ deep x 10’ wide display area where you can assemble and display your organization’s freestanding portable display.

3.) A Table Top Display is $350 and includes a 3’ deep x 6’ wide display area, a skirted 6’ table and two chairs.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Each display must be accompanied by a fully paid registration. Do not register to reserve display space until the display representative has been registered for the conference.
 

Display Set-up and Removal:

  • Recommended set up time is Monday, December 6, 2004 from 7:00AM to 12:00NOON.

  • Removal deadline is Friday, December 10, 2004 at 12:00NOON.

  • NOTE: All displays must be accompanied by a fully paid conference registrant.

Display reservations are closed.

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Hotel & Meeting Site Accommodations

Wyndham Palace

  1900 Buena Vista Drive
  Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA 32830
  PHONE: 407-827-2727
  FAX: 407-827-6034
  WEB: www.wyndham.com/hotels/MCOPV/main.wnt

The conference will be held at beautiful Wyndham Palace  located in the WALT DISNEY WORLDฎ Resort, just 18 miles from the Orlando International Airport. You and your family will enjoy complimentary lighted tennis courts, three swimming pools, a playground and children's activity programs. You'll also have access to five Disney championship golf courses, myriad restaurants and of course, personalized services at their famous spa facilities.

Should you decide to incorporate a family vacation, there are a multitude of nearby Disney Worldฎ theme parks including Epcot, Magic Kingdom, Animal Kingdom and MGM Studios, just to name a few. The Wyndham Palace Resort is offering a special rate of $95 per night, single or double occupancy plus 11 percent tax. This rate is within the confines of the federal per diem for this area, and the rate will be honored from November 30 - December 15, based on availability.

Click here to make online reservations

- or -

contact the hotel directly at: 1-407-827-3333.

Be sure to specify you are attending the National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration. All hotel reservations must be made by Friday, October 22, 2004. After this date, neither availability nor the discounted group rate is guaranteed. (To receive tax exempt status, payment must be made in the form of a government issued check, credit card or purchase order, and, be accompanied by a Florida sales tax exemption certificate presented at check-in.)

Special Instructions: A first night's room deposit must be made with a credit card, check or cash within 10 days of placing your reservation. For any reservations that "no show" or, are canceled within 72 hours of arrival, the deposit will not be refunded. Check-in time is after 3pm and check-out time is 11am. Should you arrive early or depart after these times, baggage storage areas are available for early arrivals and late departures.

SPECIAL NOTES:
 
- Adults are 18 years old and over. Children under 18 are free.
  - Rollaway beds are available for $20 per day plus current taxes.

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Conference Sponsors


Florida Earth Foundation (FEF)
real estate development company, EarthMark Companies
sfwmd.gov
South Florida Water Management District
-------------

   

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Area Information


Orlando International Airport

For advance purchase of specially-priced Disney PARK HOPPER(r) Meeting/Convention Theme Park tickets, CLICK HERE

Taxi Service


Click here for Coupon for $4 off
regular round-trip price of $29.
(Print coupon and present to
Mears Counter Attendant)

Rental Car

Avis is offering special rental 
rates to Congress 
attendees. Click here to 
make reservations

Click here to find driving directions to Orlando, FL from any address/destination in the USA by simply typing in the starting address and then the end destination address; very user friendly.

Map of Florida

Click here for a map of the state of Florida.

Mileage Chart

Click here for a chart that lists the mileage/distance
 from city to city in Florida.

Orlando Weather

NWS logo

 

Click here to see a detailed 7-day weather forecast for Orlando, FL.

Activities

Click here to explore Florida attractions, theme parks, and history by city.

Other Cities to Visit While in Florida

Florida Interactive maps – Click here

Clearwater, FL – Click here to find information and links for the city of Clearwater. Daytona Beach, FL – Click here to find information and links for the Daytona Beach area – Big Beach, Big Fun!
Fort Lauderdale, FL – Click here to find maps and information on the beaches, attractions, restaurants, and nightlife in sunny Ft. Lauderdale.

The Florida Everglades, Miami, FL – Click here to find information on how to reach the Florida Everglades, where to stay and eat, transportation, and weather in the south Florida area.

St. Augustine, FL – Click here to find information and links to Florida’s oldest city and the best it has to offer. Panama City Beach, FL – Click here to find information about “the world’s most beautiful beaches” on over 27 miles of white sand.

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Related Links

ESA
The Ecological Society of America


Society of Wetland Scientists

planter circle
Federal Symposium on Coastal
Habitat Restoration (FSCHR)

9th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands

Society for Ecological Restoration International


2005 Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment

Growth
Conference on Ecosystems Restoration and Creation

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Planning Committee

Stuart J. Appelbaum, Chief, RECOVER Branch, US Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, FL

Nicholas G. Aumen, National Park Service, Everglades Program Team, c/o A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Boynton Beach, FL

G. Ronnie Best, Conference Chair, US Geological Survey Greater Everglades Science Initiative, Pembroke Pines, FL

Donald F. Boesch, President, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, MD

Stan Bronson, Executive Director, Florida Earth Foundation, West Palm Beach, FL

Michael J. Donahue, President/CEO, Great
Lakes Commission, Ann Arbor, MI

Dennis B. Fenn, Center Director, US Geological Survey/BRD Southwest Biological Science Center, Flagstaff, AZ

Michael A. Fritz, Coordinator, Living Resources Subcommittee, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Annapolis, MD

David L. Galat, Fishery Research Biologist and Associate Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, US Geological Survey, Cooperative Research Units, Columbia, MO

Beverley B. Getzen, Chief, Office of Environmental Policy, US Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC

Barry D. Gold, Program Officer, Conservation and Science, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, CA

Rebecca W. Hamner, Director, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Annapolis, MD

Dan Hayes, Conference Co-Chair, Project Manager,  US Army Corps of Engineers, Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), West Palm Beach, FL

Samuel N. Luoma, Senior Research Hydrologist, National Restoration Program, US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

Jack Manno, Executive Director, New York Great Lakes Research Consortium and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY

Frank J. Mazzotti, Co-Chair, Local Organizing Committee, University of Florida/IFAS, University of Florida-Wildlife Ecology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Beth Miller-Tipton, Director, University of Florida/IFAS Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI), Gainesville, FL

John Ogden, Chief Environmental Scientist, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Stephen D. Parker, Director, Water Science and Technology Board, Washington, DC

Denise Reed, University of New Orleans, Department of Geology and Geophysics, New Orleans, LA

Thomas W. Richardson, Director, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS

Charles Simenstad, Research Associate Professor Coordinator, Wetland Ecosystem Team, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Tom St. Clair, Senior Project Manager, Everglades Partners Joint Venture, Jacksonville, FL

Patricia Strayer, P.E., BEM Systems, Inc., Chatam, NJ

Jim Tate, Science Advisor to the Secretary of Interior, US Department of the Interior,
Washington, DC

Kim Taylor, Deputy Director for Science, California Bay Delta Authority, Sacramento, CA

Robert Twilley, Director, Center for Ecology & Environmental Technology, University of Louisiana
at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA

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Local Organizing Committee

G. Ronnie Best, Conference Chair, US Geological Survey, Greater Everglades Science Initiative, Pembroke Pines, FL

Stan Bronson, Executive Director, Florida Earth Foundation, West Palm Beach, FL

Frank J. Mazzotti, Co-Chair, Local Organizing Committee, University of Florida/IFAS, University of Florida-Wildlife Ecology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Dan Hayes, Conference Co-Chair, Project Manager,  US Army Corps of Engineers, Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), West Palm Beach, FL

Tom St. Clair, Senior Project Manager, Everglades Partners Joint Venture, Jacksonville, FL

 

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For More Information

G. Ronnie Best
   Conference Chair
Coordinator
Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystems Science
United States Geological Survey
c/o University of Florida/IFAS
Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center
3205 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314-7799
PHONE: 954-577-6354
FAX: 954-577-6347
PHONE (CELL): 954-658-4676
EMAIL: Ronnie_Best@usgs.gov
WEB SITE: SOFIA.usgu.gov

Dan Hayes
   Conference Co-Chair
Project Manager, US Army Corps of Engineers, Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP)
1400 Centrepark, Suite 750
West Palm Beach, FL 33401-7402
PHONE: 561-683-1577 ext. 12
EMAIL: Daniel.J.Hayes@saj02.usace.army.mil

Stan Bronson
   Sponsorship and Field Trip Organizer
Executive Director, Florida Earth Foundation
3301 Gun Club Road, Mail Stop FEF
West Palm Beach, Florida 33416
PHONE: (561) 682-2059; Cell:(561) 281-5081
EMAIL: stan@floridaearth.org
WEB SITE: www.floridaearth.org

Beth Miller-Tipton
   Conference Coordinator
University of Florida/IFAS
Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)
PO Box 110750
Gainesville, FL 32611 USA
PHONE: 352-392-5930
FAX: 352-392-9734
EMAIL: bmiller-tipton@ifas.ufl.edu

 

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