2008 Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Conference

SITE INDEX

 

Introduction and Objectives Agenda Organizing Committee
Regional Context Poster Directory Questions / Contacts

Program Management Committee

Registration Information
Conference
Abstract Book
(PDF)
Scientific Oversight Panel Hotel Accommodations
Conference Themes Conference Sponsors
Call for Abstracts Travel & Area Information

Click here to view video interviews with
a few key individuals actively working in Florida Bay.

Click here for a gallery of 2008 conference photos.

Click here for 2008 Speaker PowerPoint presentations
linked from the program agenda as PDFs.

Introduction and Objectives

Click Play Button on bar above to view video

The Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Conference is a forum for researchers to exchange technical information, to share that information with resource managers and other interested conference attendees, and to establish collaborative partnerships. The conference provides scientists an opportunity to highlight their research through oral and poster presentations and open discussions.

The conference objective is to increase our understanding of the connectivity and ecological dynamics and relationships among south Florida estuarine and coastal ecosystems. These systems include Florida Bay, Biscayne Bay, Whitewater Bay, the waters of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, and other adjacent coastal systems. The conference will consider the influence of watershed management with a focus on restoration. Recent model development, applications and improved definition of restoration targets will be highlighted as well. A particular interest of this year’s conference is the linking of science findings with management decision-making.   

Return to Index

Regional Context

The geographic scope of the conference centers on Florida Bay and the adjacent mangrove-dominated estuarine transition zone but includes interactions with the Everglades, the Southwest Florida Shelf and Gulf of Mexico, the Florida Reef Tract and Biscayne Bay.

The Everglades supplies freshwater, nutrients and contaminants to Florida Bay directly through the Taylor Slough/C-111 watershed and indirectly from the Shark River Slough watershed. Hydrodynamics, salinity and water quality in Florida Bay are affected by exchanges with the Southwest Florida Shelf and the Gulf of Mexico across the bay’s western boundary and by exchanges with the Atlantic Ocean through Keys’ passes. In turn, these exchanges also affect hydrodynamics and water quality in Hawk Channel and potentially in waters along the Florida Reef Tract.

Return to Index

Program Management Committee

The Program Management Committee (PMC) is the sponsor of this conference. The PMC’s primary role is to establish direction and priorities for science activities in Florida Bay and ensure close coordination of science activities with adjacent marine systems. The PMC consists of scientific program managers from:

  • Florida Department of Environmental Protection

  • Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

  • imageMiami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management

  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration*

  • National Park Service*

  • South Florida Water Management District

  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

  • U.S. Geological Survey

         * Current PMC Co-Chairs

Return to Index

Scientific Oversight Panel

Independent expert review is an integral component of the Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Program. This need is served by a Science Oversight Panel (SOP) which participates in the conference by leading question and answer sessions and providing subsequent technical and management review of the quality of research, modeling and monitoring activities in Florida Bay and the scientific inferences from these activities. The SOP consists of six senior scientists with significant experience in major estuarine restoration programs. Its current memberships includes:

Dr. William C. Boicourt
Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD

Dr. Boicourt is a Professor of Physical Oceanography and specializes in physical oceanographic processes including circulation of the continental shelf and estuaries.


Dr. William C. Dennison
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, MD

Dr. Dennison is the Vice President for Science Applications at the University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science. He is a marine ecologist with a specialty in ecophysiology of marine plants and has conducted coastal marine research in all of the world’s oceans.


Dr. John E. Hobbie (Chair)
The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA

Dr. Hobbie is a Senior Scholar at the Marine Biological Laboratory and is a microbial ecologist specializing in biogeochemical cycles of coastal and Arctic systems.

Dr. Edward D. Houde
University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, MD

Dr. Houde is a professor at the University of Maryland and specializes in fisheries science, larval fish ecology, and resource assessment and management.


Dr. Steven C. McCutcheon, P. E.
Faculty of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Dr. McCutcheon, Past President of the American Ecological Engineering Society, is an expert in water quality management, hydrodynamics, hydrology, water resources, sediment transport, and hazardous waste management.


Dr. Hans W. Paerl
Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina, Morehead City, NC

Dr. Paerl is Kenan Professor of Marine and Environmental Sciences and his research includes nutrient cycling and production dynamics of aquatic ecosystems, environmental controls of algal production, and assessing the causes and consequences of eutrophication.

Return to Index

Conference Themes

The PMC invites presentations that refine understanding of critical linkages among south Florida coastal systems, including functional linkages with the Greater Everglades watershed, and build predictive capability regarding ecosystem structure and dynamics. Presentations will be organized across the following conference themes: Physical Processes, Water Quality (including algal blooms), Benthic Habitats, Higher Trophic Levels, the Mangrove-Estuarine Transition Zone, Restoration Targets, and Applications to Management Decision-Making. This year’s conference will include presentations on Florida Bay, but will have greater emphasis than usual on the adjacent coastal systems.

This year’s conference will also address how Florida Bay may be impacted by global climate change, and subsequent implications for resource management. As you prepare your abstract submission and conference presentation, you are encouraged to include how climate change may impact your area of research and how it relates to resource management.

Physical Processes. The character, dynamics, and connectivity of coastal ecosystems and their watersheds are strongly dependent upon the movement of water and other physical processes. To date, research and monitoring of physical processes has encompassed major physical driving forces (winds and storms, precipitation, evaporation, surface water inflow, groundwater, sea level and tides, and boundary currents) and the hydrodynamic character of Florida Bay (varying salinity and circulation patterns, and exchanges with adjacent waters). Past conferences had presentations on physical processes of Florida Bay, but few from adjacent coastal systems. Although considerable data exist on each of these processes, more work remains to adequately characterize their relative importance and variability, particularly in the case of groundwater inputs and evaporation. The degree to which these processes need to be better defined will be guided by the needs of the suite of hydrological and hydrodynamic models used to predict salinity and circulation patterns in these systems. The sufficiency of the physical models for watershed and coastal management will have to be assessed in light of physical performance measures and the data input requirements of water quality and ecological models. Furthermore, to the degree that predictions of rapid local sea level rise can be verified, the relationship between sea level and bay flushing processes will need to be better understood given the multi-decadal time span of the CERP implementation.

coordination imageWater Quality. Water quality strongly influences ecological characteristics and dynamics and is related to upstream water management and human development. The foremost need regarding water quality in Florida Bay is to accurately predict the sensitivity of the bay’s nutrient regime and phytoplankton to changes in freshwater flow into the bay. For much of the bay, any factor that increases phosphorus availability either by increasing sources or decreasing removal would likely have substantial effects. The effects of increased nitrogen, potentially introduced as dissolved organic nitrogen from the Everglades, are uncertain. For Biscayne Bay, the effect of redistributing nitrogen- rich canal water into wetlands and nearshore bay waters as part of restoration efforts is uncertain. Of particular concern is the effect of these waters on wetland vegetation communities and nearshore seagrass beds along Biscayne Bay’s western shore. Alteration of contaminant exposures is also possible with changes in the sources of water introduced into south Florida coastal systems. The occurrence of algal blooms in Florida Bay since 2005 has emphasized the need for a more thorough understanding of the nutrient cycles and other factors controlling phytoplankton blooms (e.g. benthic grazing). This knowledge is critical for ecosystem forecasting, evaluating restoration alternatives, and managing human activities that affect Florida Bay and the adjacent systems.

Benthic Habitats. Seagrass and hard-bottom habitats account for a large portion of estuarine and coastal primary production, provide food and/or shelter to many organisms, and are critical to the ecological function of south Florida coastal ecosystems. These habitats strongly influence water quality and have themselves been affected by freshwater inflow and water quality changes attributable to upstream water management practices. Critical research needs include metabolic and community responses to sediment characteristics, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen concentrations, and light levels, as well as the differential influence of different benthic communities on water quality and higher trophic levels.

Higher Trophic Levels. Advances in understanding higher trophic level responses to restoration require an interdisciplinary approach with input from all the other science themes. For instance, the basic question of "how do changes in stressors affecting south Florida estuarine and coastal systems affect pathways of higher trophic species’ movement within and between adjacent systems" requires information from physical processes, water quality, benthic habitats and the mangrove-estuarine transition zone. As many higher trophic level species initially settle in seagrass, hardbottom and mangrove communities, we cannot predict the impact of various stressors on their recruitment without understanding the impact of stressors on juvenile habitat. A major unknown is how differences in habitat distribution, density, and especially quality influence these species. Nursery area habitats need to be delineated and understood so that the potential effect of water management changes on salinity patterns, nutrient inputs, seagrass community structure and other conditions in these areas can be predicted. Linking the higher trophic level theme to the other themes will require integration (via GIS and statistical and dynamic modeling) of many system components, including salinity, fresh-water flows, benthic communities, and habitat structure and appropriate species distribution and abundance patterns.

Mangrove-Estuarine Transition Zone. The mangrove-estuarine transition zone has many important ecological attributes, many of which have been affected by altered freshwater inflow from upstream water management practices. These sensitive attributes include plant and animal community structure and productivity, nutrient processing and retention, and soil accretion or subsidence. Some of these will likely be affected by restoration activities and respond more quickly than the ecological attributes within the coastal bays and embayments.

Applications and Restoration Targets. At this point in time, researchers are being called upon not only to continue to improve and enhance understanding of Florida Bay and the coastal systems with which it is connected, but also to contribute to the adaptive assessment process adopted by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project (CERP). CERP is committed to a long-term, multi-decadal Monitoring and Assessment Plan (MAP). The regional component of the MAP that is relevant to the Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science (FBAMS) program is termed the Southern Estuaries. (Click here for PDF) A formalized assessment process has been developed by CERP’S Integrated Assessment Team. The CERP assessment process will be implemented on the same sub-regional basis. In the Southern Estuaries domain, it will be grounded upon the scientific understanding developed under the aegis of the FBAMS program. The same understanding has contributed to the specification of restoration targets as well as to mandated water management decisions. That said, the research community will need to remain engaged and involved in the process of CERP implementation to assure that it remains “science-based” and the promise of adaptive management is in fact fulfilled.1

Return to Index

Call for Abstracts

 

actual image: Research diver inspecting an Optical Plankton Counter on a mooring off Looe Key. Photo taken by Dave Forcucci.All scientists working in Florida Bay and adjacent systems are strongly encouraged to submit abstracts describing their research projects and results. Presenters are encouraged to include, when possible, links between research results and environmental management. Special consideration will be given to work that synthesizes across disciplines. Abstract submissions will be used to select oral presentations, and ALL abstracts, both oral and poster, will be published in the conference book of abstracts to be distributed at the conference and posted on the conference web site. Because the number of oral presentations will be limited, some oral presentation requests will be asked to present a poster.

Scientists not wishing to make oral presentations are strongly encouraged to prepare posters and submit an abstract. As with oral presentations, poster presentations provide a valuable opportunity for scientific interaction. Posters will be on display throughout the entire conference and a formal poster session and reception will be held Monday evening. Posters will be limited to a space of 4 feet high x 6 feet wide.

If you wish to make an oral presentation or present a poster, please submit an abstract no later than October 1, 2008. Abstracts MUST be submitted electronically via the web site. Detailed submission instructions are provided below.

Abstract Submission is Closed

Return to Index

Agenda

 

Printable Agenda (PDF)

 

Available PowerPoint presentations are linked from this agenda as PDFs. To find a specific speaker or topic, use the FIND command (CTRL+F) in your browser to search for their name or a key word from their talk title.

If you were a Florida Bay presenter, and wish to have your presentation ADDED to this site, please send an email to bmt@ufl.edu giving us permission to upload your file.


Monday, December 8, 2008

5:00pm-8:00pm

Welcome Social, Registration Opens & Poster Presenters Set-up Displays

 Tuesday, December 9, 2008 

7:15am-5:00pm

Registration Office Open and Posters on Display

7:15am-8:00am

Early Morning Refreshments

8:00am-8:10am

Welcome and Official Opening — Carol Mitchell, Co-Chair, Florida Bay Program Management Committee, and, Deputy Director for Science, South Florida Natural Resources Center, SFEO, Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL

8:10am-9:40am

Session I – Invited Speakers

MODERATOR: Carol Mitchell, Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL

8:10am-8:30am

Resource Management Needs & Information for Resource Managers — Dave Hallac, Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL      [Presentation]

8:30am-8:50am

Climate Change Implications for Management of Chesapeake Bay — Bill Boicourt, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD      [Presentation]

8:50am-9:10am

Florida’s Wildlife: On the Front Line of Climate Change — Chuck Collins, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, West Pam Beach, FL      [Presentation]

9:10am-9:30am

Climate Change Implications for Management of Florida Bay — Carol Mitchell, National Park Service, Homestead, FL      [Presentation]

9:30am-9:40am

Discussion Panel with Speakers

9:40am-10:00am

Refreshment Break & Networking

10:00am-12:30pm

Session II – Synthesis Presentations

MODERATOR: Susan Markley, Miami-Dade DERM, Miami, FL

10:00am-10:20am

Ecosystem History — Lynn Wingard, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA      [Presentation]

10:20am-10:40am

Physical ProcessesPeter Ortner, NOAA/AOML, Miami, FL      [Presentation]

10:40am-11:00am

Nutrient Dynamics/Algal BloomsDavid Rudnick, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL      [Presentation]

11:00am-11:20am

Benthic Habitats — Michael Durako, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC      [Presentation]

11:20am-11:40am

Higher Trophic Levels — Joan Browder, NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL      [Presentation]

11:40am-12:00pm

Mangrove Transition Zone — Victor Rivera-Monroy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA      [Presentation]

12:00pm-12:30pm

Discussion Panel with Speakers

12:30pm-1:30pm

Group Luncheon

1:30pm-3:10pm

Session III – Ecosystem History

MODERATOR: Lynn Wingard, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA

1:30pm-1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm-2:00pm

Verification of a Molluscan Dataset for Paleosalinity Estimation Using Modern Analogues: A Tool for Restoration of South Florida’s Estuaries — G. Lynn Wingard1 and Joel W. Hudley2; 1 U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA; 2 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA      [Presentation]

2:00pm-2:20pm

A Comparison of the Pre-drainage Everglades Hydrology and Florida Bay Salinity Based on Paleoecology from Multiple Sediment Cores Coupled with Statistical ModelsFrank E. Marshall1, G. Lynn Wingard2, Patrick Pitts3, Evelyn Gaiser4, Ania Wachnicka4;1Cetacean Logic Foundation, Inc., New Smyrna Beach, Florida, USA; 2US Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, USA; 3US Fish & Wildlife Service, Vero Beach, Florida, USA; 4Florida International University, Miami, Florida, USA      [Presentation]

2:20pm-2:40pm

Diatom-Based Inferences of Environmental Change in Florida Bay and Adjacent Coastal Wetlands of South FloridaA. Wachnicka1,2 and E. Gaiser3,2; 1Department of Earth Sciences, 2Southeast Environmental Research Center, 3Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

2:40pm-3:00pm

Characterization of Natural Stream Flow in South FloridaRichard Alleman, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA      [Presentation]

3:00pm-3:10pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

3:10pm-3:30pm

Refreshment Break and Networking

3:30pm-5:10pm

Session IV Physical Processes

MODERATOR: Jeff Woods, US Geological Survey, Fort Lauderdale, FL

3:30pm-3:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

3:40pm-4:00pm

Determining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Groundwater Discharge, to a Subtropical Estuary Using Geochemical Tracers, Biscayne Bay, South FloridaJeremy C. Stalker1, René M. Price2, Peter K. Swart3; 1Department of Earth Sciences, Florida International University; 2Department of Earth Sciences and the SERC, Florida International University; 3Marine Geology and Geophysics, RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

4:00pm-4:20pm

Effects of Groundwater on Salinity in Biscayne Bay — Sarah Bellmund1, Greg Graves2, Steve Krupa2, Herve Jobert3, Greg Garis1, and Steve Blair4; 1Biscayne National Park Salinity Monitoring Program, Biscayne National Park, Homestead, FL, USA; 2South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA; 3Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 4Miami-Dade County Department of Resources Management, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

4:20pm-4:40pm

Surface Salinity Variability of South Florida Coastal and Estuarine Waters from Gridded Shipboard Observations, 1995 – 2008 Elizabeth M. Johns1, Thomas N. Lee3, Christopher N. Kelble2, Ryan H. Smith1, Nelson Melo2, Peter B. Ortner2, and Vassiliki H. Kourafalou3; 1Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USA ; 2Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 3Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA

4:40pm-5:00pm

On Florida Bay Circulation and Water Exchange with Focus on the Western Subregion — Thomas N. Lee1, Nelson Melo2, Ned Smith3, Elizabeth M. Johns4, Ryan H. Smith4, Christopher N. Kelble2, and Peter B. Ortner2; 1Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 3Harbor Branch Oceanographic Laboratory, Ft Pierce, FL, USA; 4Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

5:00pm-5:10pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

5:30pm-8:30pm

POSTER SESSION & NETWORKING RECEPTION

 Wednesday, December 10, 2008

7:30am-5:00pm

Registration Office Open

7:30am-8:30am

Early Morning Refreshments

7:30am-5:00pm

Posters on Display

8:30am-10:10am

SESSION V – Physical Processes (continued)

MODERATOR: Mark Zucker, US Geological Survey, Fort Lauderdale, FL

8:30am-8:40am

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

8:40am-9:00am

South Florida Coastal Oceanographic Database — Nelson Melo1, Thomas N. Lee2, Elizabeth M. Johns3, Ryan H. Smith3, Chris R. Kelble1, and Peter B. Ortner1; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2 Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 3NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

9:00am-9:20am

Advection and Exchange in Florida Bay Inferred from Long-term Water Quality DataB.J. Cosby1, J. Boyer2, H. Briceno2, F. Marshall3, and W. Nuttle4; 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 3Cetacean Logic Foundation, New Smyrna Beach, FL, USA; 4Eco-hydrology, Ottawa, ON, Canada      [Presentation]

9:20am-9:40am

Enhancing and Combining Complex Numerical Models of Coastal Southern Florida — Eric Swain1, Melinda Lohmann1, and Jeremy Decker1; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA      [Presentation]

9:40am-10:00am

Interdisciplinary Modeling Support to CERP: Toward Environmental Prediction with the South Florida HYCOM System — Villy H. Kourafalou1, HeeSook Kang1, Claire Paris1, Chuanmin Hu2, Peter J. Hogan3 and Ole Martin Smedstad4; 1Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Institute for Marine Remote Sensing, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL, USA; 3Naval Research Lab, Stennis Space Center, MS, USA; 4QinetiQ North America, Technology Solutions Group – PSI, Stennis Space Center, MS, USA      [Presentation]

10:00am-10:10am

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

10:10am-10:30am

Refreshment Break and Networking

10:30am-12:10pm

SESSION VI – Water Quality/Algae Blooms

MODERATOR: David Rudnick, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

10:30am-10:40am

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

10:40am-11:00am

A Synthesis of Models to Simulate Benthic-Pelagic Coupling in Florida Bay: Examination of Ecosystem Restoration and Climate Change Effects — Christopher J. Madden1 Amanda A. McDonald1; 1Everglades Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL USA      [Presentation]

11:00am-11:20am

Phosphorus Cycling in Florida Bay: A Synthesis Marguerite S. Koch1, Ole Nielsen1, Henning S. Jensen2, Jia-Zhong Zhang3, Chris J. Madden4, Dave Rudnick4; 1Biological Sciences Department, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA; 2Biology Department, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 3NOAA, Ocean Chemistry Division, AOML, Miami, FL, USA; 4Everglades Research Division, SFWMD, West Palm Beach, USA

11:20am-11:40am

Relative Importance of Solid-Phase Phosphorus and Iron on Sediment-Water Exchange of Phosphate in Florida Bay — Jia-Zhong Zhang1 and Xiao-Lan Huang1,2 ; 1Ocean Chemistry Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USA; 2CIMAS, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

11:40am-12:00pm

Nutrient Limitation in Benthic Microalgae in Florida Bay — Merrie Beth Neely1 and Gabriel A. Vargo1; 1University of South Florida College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL, USA      [Presentation]

12:00pm-12:10pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

12:10pm-1:30pm

Group Luncheon

1:30pm-3:10 pm

Session VII – Water Quality/Algae Blooms (continued)

MODERATOR: David Rudnick, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

1:30pm-1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm-2:00pm

In situ Measurements of Sponge Respiration, Nitrification and ANAMMOX on the Florida Keys Reef Tract — Christopher S. Martens1, Niels Lindquist2, Patrick Gibson1, Howard Mendlovitz1, James Hench3 Brian Popp4, Richard Camilli5, Anthony Duryea6, Robert Byrne7, Lori Adornato8 and Xuewu Liu; 1Dept of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Institute of Marine Sciences, UNC–Chapel Hill, Morehead City, NC; 3Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, CA; 4Dept of Geol&Geophys, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI; 5Appl Ocean Phy&Eng, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA; 6Monitor Instruments Company LLC, Cheswick, PA; 7College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, St Petersburg, FL; 8SRI International, St Petersburg, FL, USA

2:00pm-2:20pm

Dissolved Organic Material and the Adaptive Physiology of Synechococcus Help to Sustain Blooms in Florida Bay — Patricia M. Glibert1, Cynthia A. Heil2, Sue Murasko2, Jeffrey Alexander1, MerrieBeth Neely2, Christopher Madden3; 1 University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge MD, USA; 2 Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL; 3 Coastal Ecosystems Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

2:20pm-2:40pm

Spatial and Temporal Shifts in Planktonic Phosphorus Limitation in Florida Bay from 2002 to 2007 — Cynthia A. Heil1, Patricia M. Glibert2, Sue Murasko3, Jeff Alexander2, Merrie Beth Neely1, Ana Hoare3 and Chris Madden4; 1Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL; 2University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge MD, USA; 3College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL USA; 4Coastal Ecosystems Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

2:40pm-3:00pm

Characterizing the Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Florida Coastal Everglades — Rudolf Jaffé1,2, M. Chen1,2 , Y. Yamashita1,2, N. Maie1,2, K. Parish1,2, R. M. Price1,3, J. Boyer1, and L. Scinto1,4; 1 Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 3 Department of Earth Science, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 4Department of Environmental Studies, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

3:00pm-3:10pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

3:10pm-3:30pm

Refreshment Break and Networking

3:30pm-5:00pm

Session VIII – Water Quality/Algae Blooms (continued)

MODERATOR: David Rudnick, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

3:30pm-3:50pm

Storm Strength, Proximity, and Water Residence Time Differentially Affect the Magnitude of Impact and Recovery Time of Phytoplankton Biomass in Separate Zones of Florida BayHenry O. Briceño and Joseph N. Boyer, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

3:50pm-4:10pm

Coupled Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Modeling of Florida Bay — John M. Hamrick1 and Zhen-Gang Ji2; 1Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA; 2Applied Environmental Engineering, LLC, Naples, FL      [Presentation]

4:10pm-4:30pm

Remote Sensing of Water Quality Index in Florida Bay and Florida Keys: Current Status and Challenge — C. Hu,1 J. Cannizzaro,1 F. Muller-Karger,2 J. Hendee3, E. Johns3, L. Gramer,4 C. Kelble,4, N. Melo4; 1College of Marine Science, Univ. South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL, USA; 2School for Marine Science and Technology, Univ Massachusetts Dartmouth, New Bedford, MA, USA; 3Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Lab, NOAA, Miami, FL, USA; 4Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Univ. Miami, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

4:30pm-4:50pm

Marine and Estuarine Goal Setting for South Florida (MARES) — Peter B. Ortner1, Carol L. Mitchell2, Joseph N. Boyer3 and Christopher R. Kelble1; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 3South Florida Natural Resources Center, Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL, USA

4:50pm-5:00pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

5:30pm-8:30pm

Networking Reception

 

Thursday, December 11, 2008

7:30am-5:00pm

Registration Office Open

7:30am-8:30am

Early Morning Refreshments

8:30am-10:10am

Session IX - Benthic Habitats

MODERATOR: Brian Keller, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Southeast Region, St. Petersburg, FL

8:30am-8:40am

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

8:40am-9:00am

Climate Change Effects on Seagrass Multiple Stressors, Nutrient Cycling and Reproduction: A Perfect Storm in Florida Bay? — Marguerite S. Koch, Biological Sciences Department, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA

9:00am-9:20am

Seagrass as Indicators of Ecosystem Change in South Florida Estuaries — M.O. Hall1, M. J. Durako2, M. Merello1, D. Berns1, J. Kunzelman1, K. Toth1 and M. Cristman3; 1Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL, USA; 2University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USA; 3Department of Statistics, University of Florida/IFAS, Gainesville, FL, USA      [Presentation]

9:20am-9:40 am

Phosphorus Availability and Salinity Control Productivity and Demography of the Seagrass Thalassia testudinum in Florida Bay — Darrell A. Herbert1 and James W. Fourqurean1, 2;1Department of Biological Sciences and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL; 2Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables, FL     

9:40am-10:00am

Effects of Fertilization and Herbivory on Seagrass Community Structure in Florida BayZayda Halun1 and James W. Fourqurean1; 1Department of Biological Sciences and Southeast Environmental Resource Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

10:00am-10:10am

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

10:10am-10:30am

Refreshment Break & Networking

10:30am-12 noon

Session X - Benthic Habitats (continued)

MODERATOR: Brian Keller, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Marathon, FL

10:30am-10:50am

Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of SAV Abundance in the Mangrove Lakes Region of Florida Bay: Relationships to Salinity, Phosphorus, and Water Clarity — Thomas A. Frankovich1, Douglas Morrison2, and James W. Fourqurean1; 1Department of Biological Sciences and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2 Everglades National Park, Florida Bay Interagency Science Center, Key Largo, FL, USA      [Presentation]

10:50am-11:10am

Multiple Lines of Evidence Suggest Long-term Eutrophication of Seagrass-dominated Nearshore Ecosystems in the Florida KeysJames W. Fourqurean, Department of Biological Sciences and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

11:10am-11:30am

Déjà Vu All Over Again: The Impact of Recent Cyanobacteria Blooms on Hard-bottom Communities in Florida Bay and the Florida Keys — Mark J. Butler IV1 and Donald C. Behringer Jr.2 1 Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA; 2 Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA      [Presentation]

11:30am-11:50am

Monitoring Coral Bleaching as an Indicator of Climate Change Resilience for Florida’s Reefs — Chris Bergh, The Nature Conservancy, Summerland Key, FL, USA      [Presentation]

11:50am-12:00pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

12 noon - 1:30pm

Group Luncheon

1:30pm-3:10 pm

Session XI – Higher Trophic Level

MODERATOR: John Lamkin, Florida Bay PMC Co-Chair, NOAA, Miami, FL

1:30pm-1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm-2:00pm

Bottlenose Dolphin Research in both Florida and Biscayne Bays and the Use of Dolphins as Indicators of Estuary Health — Jenny Litz1, Laura Engleby2, Joseph Contillo1, Lance Garrison1, John Kucklick3; 1NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Miami, FL, USA; 2Dolphin Ecology Project, St. Petersburg, FL, USA; 3National Institute of Standards and Technology, Charleston, SC, USA      [Presentation]

2:00pm-2:20pm

A Flood Tidal Transport for Pink Shrimp Larvae on the SW Florida Shelf — Maria M. Criales1, Joan A. Browder2 and Michael B. Robblee3; 1RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL, USA; 3U.S. Geological Survey, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA      [Presentation]

2:20pm-2:40pm

Mercury Bioaccumulation in Florida Bay Fish: Why so High?David W. Evans1 and Darren Rumbold2; 1NOAA, Center for Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, NC; 2Department of Marine and Ecological Sciences, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL, USA      [Presentation]

2:40pm-3:00pm

Variations in Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotopes in the Otoliths of Four Species of Juvenile Snapper (Lutjanidae) in Florida Bay — Anne B. Morgan1, Trika L. Gerard2; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Science, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, FL, USA; 2NOAA-NMFS, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL, USA

3:00pm-3:10pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

3:10pm-3:30pm

Refreshment Break and Networking (Poster presenters to remove displays)

3:30pm-5:10pm

Session XII – Higher Trophic Level (continued)

MODERATOR: John Lamkin, Florida Bay PMC Co-Chair, NOAA, Miami, FL

3:30pm-3:50pm

Concentration and Upstream Migration of Pink Shrimp Postlarvae in Northwestern Florida Bay Maria M. Criales1, Joan A. Browder2, Michael B. Robblee3, Thomas Jackson2 and Hernando Cardenas1; 1RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 2NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL; 3U.S. Geological Survey, Ft. Lauderdale, FL      [Presentation]

3:50pm-4:10pm

Contribution of Mangrove Nursery Habitats to Replenishment of Adult Reef Fish Populations in Southern Florida David L. Jones1, John F. Walter2, and Joseph E. Serafy2; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami–Rosenstiel School, Miami, FL, USA; 2NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL, USA      [Presentation]

4:10pm-4:30pm

Relationship of Mesozooplankton to Water Quality in Florida Bay — Christopher R. Kelble1, Peter B. Ortner1, Gary L. Hitchcock2 and Michael J. Dagg3; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 3Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, Chauvin, LA, USA      [Presentation]

4:30pm-4:50pm

Monitoring Populations of Fish and Macroinvertebrates in Florida BayMatheson, Jr., R.E.1, K.E. Flaherty1, and R.H. McMichael, Jr.1; 1Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, St. Petersburg, FL, USA      [Presentation]

4:50pm-5:00pm

Session Recap and Q&A with Presenters

5:00pm-5:10pm

Closing Remarks and Conference Concludes

 

Return to Index

Poster Directory

 

Printable Poster Directory (PDF)

 

(Listing is in alphabetical order by presenting author last name.)

A Review of Ruppia maritima in Relation to Salinity in Northeastern Florida BayChristian L. Avila1 and Peter Frezza2; 1Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), Miami, FL; 2Audubon of Florida, Tavernier Science Center, Tavernier, FL

Seagrass Communities of Biscayne Bay, 1999-2007 Miami-Dade CountyChristian L. Avila, Stephen Blair, Sheri Kempinski, Santiago Acevedo and Jonathan Sidner1; 1 Ecosystem Restoration & Planning Division, Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management. Miami, FL

Effects of Light and Nutrient Supply on Stable Isotope Composition and Fractionation in N-Limited Seagrass Beds — Rebecca J Bernard1 and James W Fourqurean2; 1 Florida International University, Department of Biological Sciences, Miami, FL, USA; 2 Florida International University, Department of Biological Sciences and SERC, Miami, FL, USA

Recovery Status of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Manatee Bay, Barnes Sound and Northeastern Florida Bay Following Senescence of a Prolonged Algal BloomStephen Blair1, David T. Rudnick2, Christian Avila1, Forrest Shaw1, Maurice Pierre1; Kathryne Wilson1 and Susan Markley1; 1 Ecosystem Restoration & Planning Division, Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management. Miami, FL; 2 Everglades Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Nutrient Loading in the Coastal Creeks of Northeastern Florida Bay — Carrie Boudreau1, Mark Zucker1 and Jeff Woods1; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA

Species Composition of Cyanobacterial Blooms in Florida BayJoseph N. Boyer1, Makoto Ikenaga2, Amanda Dean1, and Cristina Pisani1; 1 Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Life Science, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga, Japan

Interspecific Variation in the Elemental and Stable Isotopic Content of Seagrass Communities in South Florida Justin E. Campbell1, James W. Fourqurean1; 1Florida International University, Miami FL

Florida Bay Salinity Extremes at Long KeyAndrew G. Crowder and Jonathan S. Fajans, SEAKEYS Monitoring Program, Florida Institute of Oceanograhpy, Long Key, FL, USA

Salinity, Light, and Temperature Effects on Ruppia maritima Germination in Florida Bay — Marguerite S. Koch1, Josh Filina1, Jackie Boudreau1, Stephanie Schopmeyer1, and Chris J. Madden2; 1Biological Sciences Department, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA; 2South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA

Enhancing Adaptive Management Processes through Data Integration and Visualization — Gregory Kiker1, James Hendee2, Yuncong Li3, Chuanmin Hu4, Pamela Fletcher5, Lew Gramer6; 1University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA; 2NOAA/AOML, Miami, Florida, USA; 3University of Florida, Homestead, Florida, USA; 4University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, Florida USA; 5Florida Sea Grant, NOAA/AOML, Miami, Florida, USA; 6University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA

Halimeda Dynamics Relative to Nutrients Availability in the Florida Keys — Ligia Collado-Vides 1,2 and James W. Fourqurean1,2 ;  1Department of Biological Sciences; 2 Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Long-term Shifts in Seagrass Community Structure Follow Experimental Nutrient Enrichment in Florida Bay
Anna R. Armitage1, Thomas A. Frankovich2, and James W. Fourqurean2; 1Department of Marine Biology, Texas A&M University-Galveston, Galveston, TX, USA; 2Department of Biological Sciences and Southeastern Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Relationships Between Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Abundance and Salinity Variability within the Coastal Mangrove Zone of Northeastern Florida Bay — Peter Frezza and Jerome J. Lorenz, Audubon of Florida, Tavernier Science Center, Tavernier, FL

The Use of Otolith Microchemistry to Determine Sources of Lutjanid Recruits to the Dry Tortugas Ecological Reserve
T. Gerard 1 A. Wright 2 E. Malca 2, John Lamkin 1; 1National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Early Life History; Miami, FL; 2University of Miami, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), Miami, FL

Assessing Gaps in Florida’s Marine and Estuarine Conservation NetworkLaura Geselbracht1 and Douglas Shaw2; 1The Nature Conservancy, Wilton Manors, FL, USA; 2The Nature Conservancy, Gainesville, FL, USA

WCA 3 Decompartmentalization and Sheetflow Enhancement Project Implications to Florida Bay — Brooke Hall1, Beth Marlowe2, Sue Wilcox2, and Tom St Clair3; 1Parsons, Everglades Partners Joint Venture, Jacksonville, Fl., USA; 2United States Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, Fl., USA; 3PBS&J, Everglades Partners Joint Venture, Jacksonville, Fl., USA

Patterns of Propeller Scarring of Seagrass in Florida Bay: Associations with Physical and Visitor Use Factors and Implications for Natural Resource Management — David E. Hallac, Jimi Sadle, Leonard Pearlstine, and Fred Herling, Everglades and Dry Tortugas National Parks, South Florida Natural Resources Center, Homestead, FL

Minimum Inflow Analyses in Adjacent Systems: Why Are They Different? — Melody J. Hunt, Water Supply Department, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA

Biscayne Bay Salinity Monitoring ProgramSarah Bellmund1, Herve Jobert2, Greg Garis1, Steve Blair3, and Amy Renshaw4; 1Biscayne National Park, Homestead, FL,  USA; 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami,  Miami, FL, USA; 3Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management, Miami, FL, USA; 4South Florida Natural Resources Center, Everglades National Park, Homestead, Fl, USA

Factors Affecting Seagrass and Mangrove Fauna Adjacent to the South Biscayne Bay Shoreline — Darlene R. Johnson1, Joan A. Browder2, Joseph E. Serafy2, Michael B. Robblee3, Thomas L. Jackson2, Gladys Liehr1, Eric Buck1, and Brian Teare1; 1CIMAS/RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Southeast Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service/ NOAA, Miami, FL, USA, 3United States Geological Survey, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Everglades National Park Field Station

Juvenile Spotted Seatrout Power Analysis and Monitoring for Florida Bay Christopher R. Kelble1, Clay E. Porch2, Allyn B. Powell3, Mike Lacroix3, Michael Greene3 and Joan Browder2; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2NOAA/NMFS Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL, USA; 3NOAA Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, NC USA

Interactive Effects of Eastern Florida Bay Algal Blooms and Lake Surprise Restoration: Timing is Everything —
Stephen P. Kelly
, Christopher J. Madden, David T. Rudnick and Kevin M. Cunniff, Everglades Division, Watershed Management Department, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA

Phycobilin Analysis Protocol Development for Ground-truthing Cyanobacterial Field Monitoring in Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems J. William Louda1, Stephen P. Kelly2 and Panne Mongkhonsri1; 1Organic Geochemistry Group, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL; 2Everglades Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Pigment-based Chemotaxonomy of Florida Bay Phytoplankton and the Influences of Photic Flux —
J. William Louda, Cidya S. Grant and Panne Mongkhonsri; Organic Geochemistry Group, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL

Florida Bay Seagrass Dynamics: A Modeling Study of Interspecific Competition, Salinity, and Nutrient Control — Amanda A. McDonald1, Christopher J. Madden1, and Marguerite S. Koch2; 1Everglades Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA; 2Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA

South Florida Coastal Oceanographic Database — Nelson Melo1, Thomas N. Lee2, Elizabeth M. Johns3, Ryan H. Smith3, Chris R. Kelble1, and Peter B. Ortner1; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA

The Non-Native Red Rimmed Melania (Melanoides tuberculatus) in Biscayne Bay National Park, Florida, the Geographic Distribution and Potential for the FutureJames B. Murray1, G. Lynn Wingard1, Emily Phillips1, William B. Schill2; 1U.S.Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA; 2U.S. Geological Survey, Leetown Science Center, WV, USA

Evaluating Alternative Plans for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands ProjectPatrick Pitts1, Rick Alleman2, Mark Shafer3, Kevin Wittman3, Ernie Clarke3; 1U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Vero Beach, Florida, USA; 2South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, Florida, USA; 3U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, Florida, USA

Geochemical and Nutrient Concentrations in the Florida Bay Groundwater — René M. Price1, Jeremy C. Stalker1, Xavier Zapata-Rios1, Jean l. Jolicoeur2, David T. Rudnick3; 1Florida International University, Department of Earth Sciences and SERC, Miami, FL, USA; 2 Broward Community College, 3 South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA

Regional Patterns of Community Composition and Abundance of Seagrass-associated Fish and Invertebrates in South Florida Estuaries — Michael B. Robblee1, Joan A. Browder2, Andre Danielś1 and Robert M. Dorazio3; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Miami, FL; 2NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL; 3U.S, Geological Survey, Gainesville, FL

Use of Habitat Suitability Index Modeling for both Roseate Spoonbills (Ajaia ajaia) and American Crocodiles (Crocodylus acutus) in South FloridaF.J. Mazzotti1, S.S. Romanach2, J.J. Lorenz3, K.L. Chartier1, M.S. Cherkiss1, and L.A. Brandt4; 1University of Florida, Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, Davie, FL, USA; 2 US Geological Survey, Davie, FL, USA; 3 Audubon of Florida, Tavernier, FL, USA; 4 US Fish and Wildlife Service, Davie, FL, USA

Benthic Habitat Mapping in Biscayne National Park — Benjamin I. Ruttenberg1, Andrea Atkinson1, Andy Estep1, Judd Patterson1, Matt Patterson1, Robert Waara1, Brian Witcher1, and Elsa Alvear2; 1U.S. National Park Service, South Florida/Caribbean Network, Palmetto Bay, FL USA; 2Biscayne National Park, Homestead, FL USA

Examining Submarine Groundwater Discharge into Florida Bay using 222Rn and Continuous Resistivity Profiling —
Peter W. Swarzenski
1, Chris Reich2, and David Rudnick3; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Santa Cruz, California; 2U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL; 3South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Effects of Habitat Complexity and Nutrient Enrichment on Epifauna Abundance and Diversity in a Florida Bay Seagrass System — C. A. Weaver1, A. R. Armitage1 and J. W. Fourqurean2; 1Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 2Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Understanding Ecosystem-scale Connectivity: Methods to Track Fish from Open-ocean to Nursery Habitats to Adjacent Reefs and Back AgainS. Whitcraft1, J. Lamkin2, T. Gerard2, and E. Malca1; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami FL, USA

Power Analysis of Water Quality and Seagrass Monitoring in Caloosahatchee EstuaryDeo Chimba and Jing-Yea Yang; Stanley Consultants Inc., West Palm Beach, FL

Biscayne Bay Watershed Nutrient Load Preliminary Assessment Using WMM Miao-Li Chang1, Fawen Zheng1, Jian Shen2; 1South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL; 2Applied Environmental Engineering, LLC, Fairfax, VA

Quantity, Timing, and Distribution of Freshwater Flows into Northeastern Florida Bay, 1996-2007Mark Zucker1, Stephen Huddleston1, and, Jeff Woods1; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Florida Integrated Science Center, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA

Return to Index

Registration Information

REGISTRATION FEE SCHEDULE All figures are in US dollars ($). 

FEES:

EARLY

If register by

16-Oct-08

REGULAR

If register by

16-Nov-08

LATE/ONSITE

If register AFTER

16-Nov-08

 Conference Attendee

$295

$365

$395

 Student* Attendee

$150

$200

$250

  *Photocopy of valid student ID required. The student fee does not apply to post-docs.

 Guest** (ages 12 & above)

$95

$125

$125

  **The Guest Fee is not for use by co-workers.

Fee payments must accompany all registrations by the deadline to qualify for the applicable discount.

What Does the Registration Fee Include?

Meeting & Student Attendees: The registration fee provides full participation in the conference including registration materials and an abstract book. The fee also includes a Welcome Social on Monday evening, a Poster & Networking Session on Tuesday, and a poolside reception on Wednesday. A group lunch will be provided on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, and  morning, mid-day and afternoon refreshment breaks will be provided each day.

Guest Fee: The  guest fee allows guests 12 years of age and older to attend all three evening events.

Refund Policy: All refund requests must be received in writing by November 16, 2008. A processing fee of $125.00 will be deducted from all meeting participant refunds, $25.00 from all student and guest refunds.

Special Needs: Participants with special needs can be reasonably accommodated by contacting the Office of Conferences & Institutes at least 21 working days prior to the conference. We can be reached by phone at 1-352-392-5930, by FAX at 1-352-392-9734, or by calling 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The TDD number can only be accessed from within the State of Florida.

Register Online Now!

You may register online by check as well as by credit card.

Return to Index

Hotel Accommodations

The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club
851 Gulf Shore Blvd. North
Naples, Florida 34102
Phone: 1-239-261-2222
Fax: 1-239-261-8019

The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club is offering participants of the 2008 Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Conference, a very special guest room rate of $110.00 (plus 10 % tax) up to four people in a room. The group rate will be honored three days prior and three days following the conference, based on availability. Please note that a service charge of $3.50 per person, per day will be added as a charge for guest service personnel.

    Additional Upgrade Charges:
     
$160 Guaranteed Waterview
      $160 Efficiencies
      $210 One-bedroom Suites
      $260 One-bedroom Waterview Suites

To qualify for the special rate, reservations must be made by November 1, 2008. Be sure to specify you are attending the 2008 Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Conference. After November 1, 2008, guestrooms and the group rate may no longer be available. As this is a discounted group rate, it is not commissionable to travel agents.

Reservation Instructions: The Resort will accept reservations from individual attendees calling the Resort directly. The reservation department phone number is 1-800-237-7600.

Special Instructions: A first night’s room deposit must be made with a credit card to ensure confirmation of your hotel reservation. For any reservations that “no show”, this deposit will be forfeited. Room deposits will be considered non-refundable if canceled within eight (8) days of the group’s arrival date.

Check-In Time / Check-Out Time:
The hotel recommends arrivals after our 4:00 PM check-in time. Check out time is before 12:00 Noon.

Please visit the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club web site: www.naplesbeachhotel.com to learn more about some of the hotel's special features including golfing, tennis, complimentary valet parking and much more!

Click here for directions to the hotel. (Printable PDF)

Return to Index

Conference Sponsors

Thank you to the following organizations for their support in providing a forum for researchers to exchange technical information, to share that information with resource managers and other interested conference attendees, and to establish collaborative partnerships.

Return to Index

Travel & Area Information

Travel Information

Welcome to Southwest Florida International Airport

Naples Florida airport ground transportation

 
FloridaRoadTravel
Mileage
MapQuest
 

Information for
Foreign Travelers
 to the United States

 

Area Information

Naples, Everglades & Marco Island Information   Click for Naples, Florida Forecast

Return to Index

Organizing Committee

  • Program Management Committee (PMC)

  • Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Program

  • Florida Sea Grant College Program

  • University of Florida/IFAS, Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)

Return to Index

Questions / Contacts


Patrick A. Pitts

Conference Organizer
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
1339 20th Street
Vero Beach, Florida 32960
PHONE: 772-562-3909 x250
EMAIL: Patrick_Pitts@fws.gov

Beth Miller-Tipton
, CMP
Conference Coordinator
University of Florida/IFAS
Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)
Building 639, Mowry Road
PO Box 110750
Gainesville, FL 32611-0750
PHONE: 352-392-5930
FAX: 352-392-9734
EMAIL: bmt@ufl.edu
WEB SITE: www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu

Return to Index

A PBS videographer shoots a chemical sensor array deployed by UNC-Chapel Hill marine scientists Chris Martens and Niels Lindquist to measure benthic ocean acidification at Conch Reef, Florida. The sensor array includes several of the world’s first instruments for continuous underwater measurements including a membrane inlet mass spectrometer (up on stand) for gases and volatile species from Monitor Instruments Company and autonomous spectrophotometers (on bottom in foreground) for pH and nitrate from USF and SRI, Int’l.

UF/IFAS Office of Conferences and Institutes

This page is designed and maintained by Greg Wilson UF/IFAS/OCI Graphics Editor and Webmaster

You are visitor number: Hit Counter since 12/06/07.