SITE INDEX



 

Introduction
and Objectives
Conference Themes Registration Information
Regional Context

Call for Abstracts

Hotel Accommodations

Program Management Committee

Organizing Committee

Travel & Area Information

Other Sites of Interest

Agenda

Questions / Contacts

Scientific Oversight
Panel

Poster Directory

 

2005 Abstract Book (PDF format)

Introduction and Objectives

The Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Conference allows researchers to exchange technical information, to share that information with resource managers and other interested conference attendees, and to establish collaborative partnerships. The conference provides scientists an opportunity to highlight their research through oral and poster presentations and open discussions.  

This year’s conference objective is to increase our understanding of the connectivity and relationships between Florida Bay and nearby coastal ecosystems and the managed upstream system with a focus on restoration. Recent model development, applications and improved definition of restoration targets will be highlighted as well. 

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Regional Context

The geographic scope of the conference centers on Florida Bay and the adjacent mangrove-dominated estuarine transition zone but includes interactions with the Everglades, the Southwest Florida Shelf and Gulf of Mexico, the Florida Reef Tract and Biscayne Bay.

The Everglades supplies freshwater, nutrients and contaminants to Florida Bay directly through the Taylor Slough/C-111 watershed and indirectly from the Shark River Slough watershed. Hydrodynamics, salinity and water quality in Florida Bay are affected by exchanges with the Southwest Florida Shelf and the Gulf of Mexico across the bay’s western boundary and by exchanges with the Atlantic Ocean through Keys’ passes. In turn, these exchanges also affect hydrodynamics and water quality in Hawk Channel and potentially in waters along the Florida Reef Tract.

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Program Management Committee

The Program Management Committee (PMC) is the sponsor of this conference. The PMC’s primary role is to establish direction and priorities for science activities in Florida Bay and ensure close coordination of science activities with adjacent marine systems. The PMC consists of scientific program managers from:

  • Florida Department of Environmental Protection

  • Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission*

  • imageMiami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management

  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration*

  • National Park Service

  • South Florida Water Management District

  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

  • U.S. Geological Survey

         * Current PMC Co-Chairs

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 Scientific Oversight Panel

Independent expert review is an integral component of the Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Program. This need is served by a Science Oversight Panel (SOP) which participates in the conference by leading question and answer sessions and providing subsequent technical and management review of the quality of research, modeling and monitoring activities in Florida Bay and the scientific inferences from these activities. The SOP consists of six senior scientists with significant experience in major estuarine restoration programs. Its current memberships includes:

Dr. William C. Boicourt
Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD

Dr. Boicourt is a Professor of Physical Oceanography and specializes in physical oceanographic processes including circulation of the continental shelf and estuaries.


Dr. William C. Dennison
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, MD

Dr. Dennison is the Vice President for Science Applications at the University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science. He is a marine ecologist with a specialty in ecophysiology of marine plants and has conducted coastal marine research in all of the world’s oceans.


Dr. John E. Hobbie (Chair)
The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA

Dr. Hobbie is Co-Director of The Ecosystems Center and is a coastal microbial ecologist specializing in biogeochemical cycles of large coastal and wetlands systems.

Dr. Edward D. Houde
University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, MD

Dr. Houde is a professor at the University of Maryland and specializes in fisheries science, larval fish ecology, and resource assessment and management.


Dr. Steven C. McCutcheon
Hydrologic & Environmental Engineering, Athens, GA

Dr. McCutcheon is a specialist in water quality issues, hydrodynamic modeling, sediment transport, and hazardous waste management.


Dr. Hans W. Paerl
Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina, Morehead City, NC

Dr. Paerl is Kenan Professor of Marine and Environmental Sciences and his research includes nutrient cycling and production dynamics of aquatic ecosystems, environmental controls of algal production, and assessing the causes and consequences of eutrophication.

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Conference Themes

The PMC invites presentations that refine understanding and build predictive capability of critical linkages across the following conference themes: Physical Processes, Water Quality, Benthic Habitats, Higher Trophic Levels, the Mangrove-Estuarine Transition Zone, Applications and Restoration Targets, and Adjacent Systems.

Physical Processes. To date, research and monitoring of physical processes has encompassed all major physical driving forces (i.e., winds and storms, precipitation, evaporation, surface water inflow, groundwater, sea level and tides, and boundary currents) and the hydrodynamic character of Florida Bay (i.e., varying salinity and circulation patterns, and exchanges with adjacent waters). Although considerable data exist on each of these processes, more work remains to fully characterize their relative importance and variability, particularly in the case of groundwater inputs and evaporation for which available estimates vary over a significant range of values. The degree to which these processes need to be better defined will be determined by the needs of the suite of hydrological and hydrodynamic models used to predict bay salinity and circulation patterns. The same can be said for improved measurements of such hydrodynamic characteristics as bathymetry and flow across the extensive mud banks that divide the inner portion of Florida Bay. The sufficiency of the physical models will have to be assessed in light of the requirements of the numeric and statistical water quality and ecological models and improved or modified if necessary. Furthermore, to the degree that predictions of rapid local sea level rise can be verified, the relationship between sea level and bay flushing processes will need to be better understood given the multi-decadal time span of the CERP implementation.

coordination imageWater Quality. Water quality has been shown to have substantial ecological consequence and be related to upstream water management and human development. The foremost need regarding water quality is to accurately predict the sensitivity of Florida Bay’s nutrient regime and phytoplankton to changes in freshwater flow into the bay. For much of the bay, any factor that increases phosphorus availability either by increasing sources or decreasing removal would likely have substantial effects. The effects of increased nitrogen, potentially introduced as dissolved organic nitrogen from the Everglades, are uncertain. Alteration of contaminant exposures is also possible with changes in the sources of water introduced into the bay. In general, a more thorough understanding of the bay’s nutrient cycles is critical to making predictions and evaluating restoration alternatives.

Benthic Habitats. Seagrass and hardbottom habitats account for a large portion of primary production, provide food and/or shelter to many organisms, and are critical to the ecological function of Florida Bay. These habitats strongly influence water quality and have themselves been affected by freshwater inflow and water quality changes attributable to upstream water management practices. Research has yet to address critical metabolic and community responses to sediment characteristics, water temperature, salinity, and light levels.

Higher Trophic Levels. Advances in understanding higher trophic level responses to restoration require an interdisciplinary approach with input from all the other science themes. For instance, the basic question of "how do changes in stressors affecting the bay affect pathways of higher trophic species’ movement within and between adjacent systems" requires information from physical processes, water quality, benthic habitats and the mangrove-estuarine transition zone. As many higher trophic level species initially settle in seagrass, hardbottom and mangrove communities, we cannot predict the impact of various stressors on their recruitment without understanding the impact of stressors on juvenile habitat. These nursery areas need to be delineated so that the potential effect of water management changes on salinity patterns, nutrient inputs, seagrass community structure and other conditions in these areas can be predicted. Linking the higher trophic level theme to the other themes will require complete GIS integration data layers as they become available including salinity, fresh-water flows, benthic communities, and habitat structure and appropriate species distribution and abundance patterns.

Mangrove-Estuarine Transition Zone. The Florida Bay mangrove-estuarine transition zone has many important ecological attributes, many of which have been affected by altered freshwater inflow from upstream water management practices. These sensitive attributes include plant and animal communities, nutrient processing and retention, and soil accretion or subsidence. Some of these will likely be affected by restoration activities and respond more quickly than the same attributes within Florida Bay.

Applications and Restoration Targets. At this point in time researchers are being called upon not only to continue to improve and enhance understanding of Florida Bay and the coastal systems with which it is connected, but also to contribute to the adaptive assessment process adopted by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project (CERP). CERP is committed to a long-term, multi-decadal Monitoring and Assessment Plan (MAP), the regional component of which that is relevant to the Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science (FBAMS) program is termed the Southern Estuaries. (Click here for PDF) A formalized assessment process has been developed by CERP’S Integrated Assessment Team. The CERP assessment process will be implemented on the same sub-regional basis. In the Southern Estuaries domain it will be grounded upon the scientific understanding developed under the aegis of the FBAMS program. The same understanding has contributed to the specification of restoration targets as well as to mandated water management decisions. That said, the research community will need to remain engaged and involved in the process of CERP implementation to assure that it remains “science-based” and the promise of adaptive management is in fact fulfilled.

Adjacent Systems. Adjacent to Florida Bay are Biscayne Bay, the waters of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, and other marine and upstream systems. This session will consist of a suite of presentations and posters on a wide-ranging suite of topics where the studies were conducted within these adjacent systems. Some presentations will emphasize connectivity to Florida Bay and others will be wholly contained within the adjacent system.

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Call for Abstracts

actual image: Research diver inspecting an Optical Plankton Counter on a mooring off Looe Key. Photo taken by Dave Forcucci.All scientists working in Florida Bay are strongly encouraged to submit abstracts describing their research projects and current status. Special consideration will be given to work that synthesizes across disciplines or utilizes simulation techniques. Abstract submissions will be used to select oral presentations, and ALL abstracts, both oral and poster, will be published in the conference book of abstracts to be distributed at the conference and posted on the conference web site. Because the number of oral presentations will be limited, some oral presentation requests will be asked to present a poster.

Florida Bay scientists not wishing to make oral presentations are strongly encouraged to prepare posters and submit an abstract. As with oral presentations, poster presentations provide a valuable opportunity for scientific interaction. Posters will be on display throughout the entire conference and a formal poster session and reception will be held Monday evening. Posters will be limited to a space of 4 feet high x 6 feet wide.

If you wish to make an oral presentation or present a poster, please submit an abstract no later than September 9, 2005. Abstracts MUST be submitted electronically via the web site. Detailed submission instructions are provided below.

The abstract submission process is now closed. Authors will be notified of abstracts selections
via email by September 30.

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Agenda

  As of 10/04/05


(Presenting Authors are indicated in bold.)

AGENDA INDEX

 

 Sunday, December 11, 2005

 

 Monday, December 12, 2005

 Tuesday, December 13, 2005

 Wednesday, December 14, 2005


Sunday, December 11, 2005

5:00pm–7:00pm

Registration Office Open

5:00pm–7:00pm

Poster Presenters to Set up Displays

7:00pm–9:00pm

Early Bird Social in Poster Display Area

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Monday, December 12, 2005

7:30am–5:00pm

Registration Office Open

7:30am–8:15am

Early Morning Refreshments in Poster Display Area

8:15am–8:30am

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Welcome and Official Opening

SESSION I Applications and Restoration Targets

Session Moderator: John Hunt, Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC), Marathon, FL

8:30am–8:50am

Synthesis and Analysis of Ecological Information to Determine Minimum Flows and Levels for Florida Bay — David Rudnick1, Melody Hunt1, Christopher Madden1, Robin Bennett1, Amanda McDonald1 and Joel VanArman2; 1Coastal Ecosystems Division, SFWMD, West Palm Beach, FL 2Water Supply Department, SFWMD, West Palm Beach, FL;

8.50am–9:10am

The Challenges of Setting Performance Measures for South Florida’s Estuaries: Nearshore Transition Zones versus Middle to Outer Bay Zones — G. Lynn Wingard1 and Joel W. Hudley1; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA

9:10am–9:30am

 The Environment of Florida Bay: Past. Present. Future? Joseph C. Zieman, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

9:30am–9:50am

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

9:50am–10:20am

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Refreshment Break & Networking in Poster Display Area

SESSION II Mangrove Transition Zone

Session Moderator: Steve Gilbert – US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Vero Beach, FL

10:20am–10:30am

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

10:30am–10:50am

Marsh Ecosystem Nitrogen Dynamics of the C-111 Basin — Daniel L. Childers1and Jeffrey R. Wozniak1; 1Florida International University and Florida Coastal Everglades LTER, Miami, FL

10:50am–11:10am

Terrestrial Brackish Groundwater Discharge – a Significant Flux of Phosphorus to the Mangrove-Estuarine Transition Zone of the Southern Everglades — René M. Price1, Peter K. Swart2 and James W. Fourqurean3; 1Department of Earth Sciences and the Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL; 2Marine Geology and Geophysics, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 3 Department of Biological Sciences and the Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL

11:10am–11:30am

Landscape-scale Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Aboveground Net Primary Productivity (ANPP) in Everglades National Park (2001-2004) — Sharon M.L. Ewe1, Evelyn E. Gaiser1, Daniel L. Childers1, Victor H. Rivera-Monroy2, David Iwaniec1, Jim Fourqurean1, Robert
R. Twilley2;
1Southeast Environmental Research Center and the Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL; 2Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA;

11:30am–11:50am

Integrating Physical and Ecological Models to Assess Restoration Impacts on Fish, Roseate Spoonbills and American Crocodiles in Northeastern Florida Bay — Jerome J. Lorenz1, Jon C. Cline2, Eric D. Swain3, Donald L. DeAngelis4,Valerie L. Chartier5, Kevin
Chartier5, Mike Cherkiss5, Leonard Pearlstine5, Frank J. Mazzotti5
; 1Audubon of Florida, Tavernier Science Center, Tavernier, FL;
2
Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH; 3USGS Center for Water and Restoration Science, Ft. Lauderdale, FL; 4Departmwent of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL; 5Ft. Lauderdale Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Davie, FL

11:50am -12:10pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

12:10pm–1:30pm

 

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Group Luncheon in Poster Display Area
- The hotel guest rate includes a daily lunch ticket. If you will be commuting and will not be staying in the host hotel, lunch tickets can be purchased from the hostess each day.

SESSION III – Benthic Habitat

Session Moderator: Susan Markley – Miami-Dade Environmental Resources Management, Miami, FL

1:30pm–1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm–2:00pm

Bay-Scale Changes in Florida Bay Macrophyte Cover: 1995 – 2004 — J. Brooke Landry1, Michael J. Durako1, and Margaret O. Hall2; 1Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC; 2Fish & Wildlife Research Center, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL

2:00pm–2:20pm

Inorganic Phosphate Kinetics in Florida Bay Seagrass Ecosystems: 33P Experiments and In Situ Chamber Studies — 1Ole Nielsen, 1M. Koch, 2H.S. Jensen and 3C.J. Madden; 1Aquatic Plant Ecology Lab, Biological Sciences Department, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL; 2Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 3South Florida Water Management District, Coastal Ecosystems Division, West Palm Beach, FL

2:20pm–2:40pm

Diel Light Curves’ Ability to Incorporate Temporal and Spatial Variation of Photosynthetic Characteristics of Thalassia testudinum in Florida Bay E. F. Belshe1, M. J. Durako1; 1Center for Marine Science and Department of Biology and Marine Biology, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC

2:40pm–3:00pm

Florida Bay Seagrass Seedling Responses to Hyposalinity and Ammonium Fluctuations: A Study of Thalassia testudinum Banks ex König — Amanda E. Kahn1, Michael J. Durako1, and Marguerite S. Koch2; 1University of North Carolina Wilmington Center for Marine Science, Wilmington, NC; 2Florida Atlantic University Aquatic Plant Ecology Lab, Boca Raton, FL

3:00pm–3:30pm

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Refreshment Break and Networking in Poster Display Area

SESSION III – Benthic Habitat (continued)

Session Moderator: Susan Markley – Miami-Dade Environmental Resources Management, Miami, FL

3:30pm–3:50pm

High Salinity Event of 2004-2005 and Responses of the Seagrasses Community in Northeast Florida Bay — Christian L. Avila, Stephen M. Blair, Christine D. Hopps, Susan K. Kemp, Omar Z. Abdelrahman, Maurice J. Pierre and Kathryn M, Skindzier; Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), Miami, FL

3:50pm–4:10pm

A Conceptual Model for Seagrass Die-off in Florida Bay Based on Mesocosm and Field Experiments — 1Marguerite Koch, 1Stephanie Schopmeyer, 1Claus Kyhn-Hansen, 1Ole Nielsen and 2Chris Madden; 1Aquatic Plant Ecology Lab, Biological Sciences Department, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL; 2 South Florida Water Management District, Coastal Ecosystems Division, West Palm Beach, FL

4:10pm–4:30pm

The Florida Bay Seagrass Model: Examination of Fresh Water Effects on Seagrass Ecological Processes, Community Dynamics and Seagrass Die-off — Christopher J. Madden and Amanda A. McDonald, Coastal Ecosystems Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

4:30pm–5:00pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

5:00pm–8:00pm

POSTER SESSION & NETWORKING RECEPTION

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Tuesday, December 13, 2005

7:30am–5:00pm

Registration Office Open

7:30am–8:30am

Early Morning Refreshments

7:30am–5:00pm

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Posters on Display

SESSION IV – Water Quality

Session Moderator: David Rudnick – South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), West Palm Beach, FL

8:30am–8:40am

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

8:40am–9:00am

Sediment Phosphate Flux and Benthic Microalgal Communities in Florida Bay, USA — Merrie Beth Neely1, 2 and Gabriel A. Vargo2; 1Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, St. Petersburg, FL; 2University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL

9:00am–9:20am

Denitrification versus Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium (DNRA) or Nitrite (DNRN) in Hypersaline Florida Bay Sediments in August 2004 and January 2005 — Wayne S. Gardner1 and Mark J. McCarthy1; 1The University of Texas at Austin Marine Science Institute, Port Aransas, TX

9:20am–9:40am

Bioavailability of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in Florida Bay — Joseph N. Boyer1, Susan K. Dailey1, Patrick Gibson1, Nagamitsu Maie1,2 and Rudolf Jaffé1,2; 1Southeast Environmental Research Center, 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL

9:40am–10:00am

Effects of Post-Hurricane Freshwater Imports from the Everglades on Bacterial Community Composition, Ectoenzyme Activities, and Nitrogen Cycling in Northern Florida Bay Frank J. Jochem1 and Clayton J. Williams1; 1 Marine Biology Program, Florida International University, North Miami, FL

10:00am–10:30am

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Refreshment Break and Networking in Poster Display Area

SESSION IV – Water Quality (continued)

Session Moderator: David Rudnick – South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), West Palm Beach, FL

10:30am–10:50am

Organic and Inorganic Nutrients, Rates of Phytoplankton Nutrient Uptake, and Their Relationship with Phytoplankton Community Composition in Florida Bay and in a Comparative Subtropical Ecosystem in Australia — P. M. Glibert1, C.A. Heil2, 3, J. Alexander1, M. Revilla1, S. Murasko2, A. Hoare2, J. O’Neil1, W.C. Dennison1 and
D. Hollander2
; 1University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD; 2College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL; 3Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL

10:50am–11:10am

Nutrient Quality Drives Phytoplankton Community Composition on the Southwestern Florida Shelf Region, including Florida Bay — Cynthia A. Heil1, M. Revilla2, P. M. Glibert2, J. Alexander2, S. Murasko3, D. Hollander3, and Ana Hoare3; 1Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, St. Petersburg, FL; 2 University of Maryland Center for Environmental Research, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD; 3College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL

11:10am–11:30am

Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessment: Florida Bay and South Biscayne Bay — G.M. Rand1, P.R. Gardinali1, W.B. Perry2, J.F. Carriger1, M. Tompkins1, and A Fernandez1; 1Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL; 2Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL

11:30am–12 noon

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

12 noon–1:30pm

 

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Group Luncheon in Poster Display Area
- The hotel guest rate includes a daily lunch ticket. If you will be commuting and will not be staying in the host hotel, lunch tickets can be purchased from the hostess each day.

SESSION V – Physical Processes

Session Moderator: Patrick Pitt – US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), Vero Beach, FL

1:30pm–1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm–2:00pm

Sedimentation and Circulation Changes in Florida Bay as a Response to Climate Change — Charles W. Holmes, Center for Coastal and Wetland Studies, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL

2:00pm–2:20pm

Estimating Evaporation Rates in Time and Space across Florida Bay — René M. Price1, William K. Nuttle2, Bernard J. Cosby3, Peter K. Swart4; 1Department of Earth Sciences and the Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL; 2Eco-Hydrology, Ottawa, Canada; 3Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; 4Marine Geology and Geophysics, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL

2:20pm–2:40pm

Atmospheric-Aqueous Exchange of Carbon Dioxide in Florida Bay — Wade R McGillis1,2, Peter A. Raymond3, Susan K. Dailey4, and
Joseph N. Boyer4;
1Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY; 2Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY; 3Yale University, New Haven, CT; 4Florida International University, Miami, FL

2:40pm–3:00pm

On Florida Bay Hypersalinity and Water Exchange — Thomas N. Lee1, Elizabeth Johns2, Nelson Melo3, Ryan Smith2, Peter Ortner2, Dewitt Smith4, and Ned Smith5; 1Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 2NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL; 3Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 4ENP, Homestead, FL; 5Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Ft Pierce, FL

3:00pm–3:30pm

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Refreshment Break & Networking in Poster Display Area

SESSION V – Physical Processes (continued)

Session Moderator: Patrick Pitt – US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), Vero Beach, FL

3:30pm–3:50pm

Flows and Stages in the Southern Everglades and Along the Coastal Boundaries of Florida Bay – Calibration and Scenario Applications of the Time Model — John D. Wang1, Eric D. Swain2, Melinda A. Wolfert2, Christian D. Langevin2, Dawn James2; 1Applied Marine Physics, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 2U.S. Geological Survey Florida Integrated Science Center, Water and Restoration Studies, Fort Lauderdale, FL

3:50pm–4:10pm

The South Florida Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model: An Integrated Approach for Florida Bay Modeling — Villy Kourafalou and
Rolando Balotro,
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL

4:10pm–4:30pm

Status of the Florida Bay Hydrodynamic Model — J. M. Hamrick1, M. Z. Moustafa2, and D. Worth2; 1Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA; 2South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL;

4:30pm–5:00pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

6:00pm–9:00pm

Poolside Networking Reception

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Wednesday, December 14, 2005

7:30am–5:00pm

Registration Office Open

7:30am–8:30am

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Early Morning Refreshments in Poster Display Area

SESSION VI – Higher Trophic Levels

Session Moderator: Peter Ortner – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) & Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS), University of Miami, Miami, FL

8:30am–8:40am

Session Overview and Introduction

8:40am–9:00am

Examining Interactive Effects of Salinity and Seagrass Habitat on Higher Trophic Level Species for the Development of Florida Bay Minimum Flows and Levels Technical Criteria Robin Bennett1, Darlene Johnson2, Joan Browder3, Amanda McDonald1, Christopher Madden1, David Rudnick1, Michael Robblee4; 1 Coastal Ecosystems Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL; 2 Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 3 NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL; 4 United States Geological Survey, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Miami, FL

9:00am–9:20am

Transport of Pink Shrimp Postlarvae into Interior Florida Bay — Joan A. Browder1, Maria M. Criales2, Michael B. Robblee3, John Wang2 and Thomas Jackson1; 1NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL; 2RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, Fl; 3U.S. Geological Survey, Miami, FL

9:20am–9:40am

Cross-Shelf Larval Transport and Behavior of Pink Shrimp at the SW Florida Shelf — Maria M. Criales1, Joan A. Browder2, Michael B. Robblee3 and Christopher K. N. Mooers1 ; 1RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 2NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL; 3U.S. Geological Survey, Miami, FL

9:40am–10:00am

Application of a Simulation Model of Pink Shrimp Growth and Survival — Joan A. Browder1, Darlene R. Johnson2, Robin Bennett3, Frank Marshall4and John Wang5; 1NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL; 2Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL; 3South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL; 4Cetacean Logic Foundation, Inc., New Smyrna Beach, FL; 5Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL

10:00am–10:30am

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Refreshment Break & Networking in Poster Display Area

SESSION VI – Higher Trophic Levels (continued)

Session Moderator: Peter Ortner – NOAA/AOML & RSMAS/UM , Miami, FL

10:30am–10:50am

Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Estuarine Fish to Salinity Changes in Florida and Biscayne Bays — Pamela Bachman1 , Gary M. Rand1and William B. Perry.2; 1Florida International University, North Miami, FL, 2Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL

10:50am–11:10am

The Use of Otolith Microchemistry to Monitor and Evaluate the Movement of Coral Reef Fish in South Florida Waters — Trika L. Gerard1, Dave Jones2, Monica Lara2; 1National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NMFS SE Fisheries, Miami, FL; 2U Miami, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Miami, FL

11:10am–11:30am

Hard-bottom Community Ecology in the Florida Keys with an Emphasis on Sponges —Mark J. Butler, IV, Donald C. Behringer,
and A. Kathryn Kauffman, Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA

11:30am–12:00pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

12 noon–1:30pm

 

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Group Luncheon in Poster Display Area
- The hotel guest rate includes a daily lunch ticket. If you will be commuting and will not be staying in the host hotel, lunch tickets can be purchased from the hostess each day.

SESSION VII – Adjacent Systems

Session Moderator: Brian Keller –Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS), Marathon, FL

1:30pm–1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm–2:00pm

Biscayne Bay’s Shallowest Habitats: Linking Seasonal Patterns in Benthic Community Structure with Salinity and Temperature Patterns — Diego Lirman1, Joe Serafy1, 2, Greg DeAngelo3, Amit Hazra1 and Destiny Smith2; 1University of Miami, RSMAS, Miami, FL; 2NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service, Miami, Fl; 3NOAA/National Geodetic Survey, Silver Spring, MD

2:00pm–2:20pm

Hindcasting Salinity in Biscayne Bay — Rick Alleman1 and D. Michael Parrish2; 1Coastal Ecosystems Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL; 2BEM Systems, Inc., West Palm Beach, FL

2:20pm–2:40pm

The Role of Sponges in N Cycling and Total Respiration in Shallow Water Florida Keys Ecosystems — Christopher S. Martens1, Niels Lindquist2, Melissa W. Southwell1, Jeremy B. Weisz2, James Hench3; 1Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Institute of Marine Sciences, UNC–Chapel Hill, Morehead City, NC; 3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, CA

2:40pm–3:00pm

Nutrient Export from Florida Bay to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary — Patrick J. Gibson1, Joseph N. Boyer1 and Ned P. Smith2; 1Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL; 2Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Ft. Pierce, FL

3:00pm–3:30pm

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Refreshment Break & Networking in Poster Display Area

SESSION VII – Adjacent Systems (continued)

Session Moderator: Brian Keller –Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS), Marathon, FL

3:30pm–3:50pm

Transport Along and Across Hawk Channel: The Last Link in the Gulf-to-Atlantic Transport Pathway to the Reef Tract — Ned P. Smith, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Fort Pierce, FL

3:50pm–4:10pm

Decadal-Scale Ecological Shifts along the Florida Reef Tract: Understanding Cause and Effect — William F. Precht1, Steven L. Miller2; 1Ecological Sciences Program, PBS&J, Miami, FL; 2Center for Marine Science and NOAA’s National Undersea Research Center, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Key Largo, FL

4:10pm–4:30pm

Initial Responses of Reef Fishes to Tortugas Ecological Reserves: Protecting Resources while Benefiting Fisheries — Jerald S. Ault2, James Bohnsack1, Steven G. Smith2, Jiangang Luo2, Douglas E. Harper1 and David B. McClellan1; 1NOAA Fisheries, Miami, FL; 2RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL

4:30pm–5:00pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

5:00pm

Conference Concludes

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Poster Directory

(Presenting Authors are indicated in bold.)

POSTER DIRECTORY INDEX

Applications and Restoration Targets

Mangrove-Estuarine Transition Zone 

Benthic Habitats

Water Quality 

Physical Processes

Higher Trophic Levels

Adjacent Systems

 

 

Applications and Restoration Targets

Selection of Vital Signs in Florida Bay for the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program – Andrea Atkinson, Matt Patterson, W. Jeff Miller, Brian Witcher and Kevin R. T. Whelan; National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program, South Florida / Caribbean Network

Linking Greater Everglades Ecosystems with Florida Bay: Development of Metrics to Measure Restoration Success in the Face of Uncertainty – Andrew D. Gottlieb1, Thomas St. Clair1 and Lisa Sterling1; PBS&J, Jacksonville, FL, USA

Implications of Climate Change and Climate Variability upon South Florida Ecosystem Restoration and CERP – Peter B. Ortner; Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL

Florida Bay – A Balanced Approach – M. L. Robbart1, W. F. Precht1 and Deborah Drum2; 1PBS&J, Miami, Florida, U.S.A., 2Battelle Memorial Institute, West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A.

The Florida Ocean and Coastal Resources Council – Steven H. Wolfe; Office of Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL, USA

Occurrence of C25 Highly Branched Isoprenoids in Florida Bay: Paleoenvironmental Indicators of Diatom-derived Organic Matter Inputs – Y. Xu1, 4, A. Wachnicka2, 4, E. E. Gaiser3, 4 and R. Jaffé1, 4; 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 2Department of Earth Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 3Department of Biology, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 4Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Applications of Molecular Markers in the Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction of Florida Bay – Y. Xu and R. Jaffé; Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC) and Department of Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA  

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Mangrove-Estuarine Transition Zone 

Forecasting Responses of the Endangered American Crocodile to Alternatives for Restoration of Greater Everglades Ecosystems – V. L. Chartier, K. L. Chartier, M. S. Cherkiss, J. Lorenz, L. G. Pearlstine, E. Swain and F. J. Mazzotti; University of Florida, Davie, Florida, USA

Linking Hydrologic Modeling and Ecologic Modeling: Application of Spatially-Explicit Species Index (SESI) Model for Adaptive Ecosystem Management in the Everglades Mangrove Zone of Florida Bay – Jon C. Cline1, Jerome J. Lorenz2 and Eric D. Swain3; 1Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH, USA, 2Audubon of Florida, Tavernier Science Center, Tavernier, FL, USA, 3USGS Center for Water and Restoration Science, Ft. Lauderdale, FL USA

Assessing the Preservation of Organic Matter in the Mangrove-Dominated Estuary of Shark River Slough – Joshua Cloutier1 and Rudolf Jaffe1,2; 1Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 2Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Effects of an Abnormally Hypersaline Year (2004-05) on the Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in the Mangrove Ecotone of Northeastern Florida Bay – Peter Frezza, Luis Cañedo and Jerome J. Lorenz, Audubon of Florida, Tavernier Science Center, Tavernier, FL

Trends in the Density of Eleocharis cellulosa in Relation to Salinity and Hydroperiod in the Coastal Wetlands of Northeastern Florida Bay – Peter Frezza, Luis Cañedo and Jerome J. Lorenz; Audubon of Florida, Tavernier Science Center, Tavernier, FL

Tracking Rates of Salt-Water Encroachment Using Fossil Mollusks in Coastal South Florida – Evelyn E. Gaiser1,2, Angelikie Zafiris1, Pablo L. Ruiz2, Franco A. C. Tobias2 and Michael S. Ross2; 1Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 2Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Sedimentologic and Geophysical Study of the Stratigraphy and Development of a Modern Carbonate Island, Cotton Key, Florida – R. V. Demicco and Joel W. Hudley; Department of Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, USA

Habitat Suitability Index for Roseate Spoonbills Nesting in Northeastern Florida Bay – Jerome J. Lorenz; Audubon of Florida, Tavernier Science Center,
Tavernier, FL

Using Albino Mutations in Red Mangroves as an Indicator of Anthropogenic Stress and A Long-term Metric of Recovery following Restoration in Florida Bay –
C. Edward Proffitt
1 and Steven E. Travis2; 1 Dept. of Biological Sciences, Florida Atlantic University, and Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 USGS National Wetlands Research Center, Lafayette, LA

Mapping Height and Biomass of Mangrove Forests in the Everglades National Park with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Elevation Data – Marc Simard1, Keqi Zhang2, Victor H. Rivera-Monroy3, Michael Ross2, Pablo Ruiz2, Robert Twilley3, Edward Castañeda3 and Ernesto Rodriguez1; 1Radar Science and Engineering, Caltech-Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, USA, 2International Hurricane Research Center & Department of Environmental Studies, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 3Wetland Biogeochemesrty Institute, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Lousiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

Water-Delivery-Optimization Modeling for Restoration Performance Measures: Salinity in Florida Bay, Florida – Eric D. Swain1 and Dawn E. James2; 1U.S. Geological Survey Florida Integrated Science Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL, 2MWH Americas, Inc., Cape Coral, FL

Developing Shallow-Water Acoustic Telemetry Methods for Juvenile Snapper Habitat Studies in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary – Samantha R. Whitcraft1, Bill Richards2, John Lamkin2, Trika Gerard2, Tom Carlson3, Geoff McMichael4, Jessica Vucelick4, Greg Williams5 and Lisa Pytka6; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami FL, 2Early Life History Lab, NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami FL, 3Pacific Northwest National Lab/Battelle, Portland OR, 4Ecology Group, Pacific Northwest National Lab/Battelle, Richland WA, 5Sequim Marine Sciences Lab, Pacific Northwest National Lab/Battelle, Sequim WA, 6New College of Florida, Sarasota FL

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Benthic Habitats

Channel/Bank Systems and Linkage among Bioregions of the South Florida Ecosystem – John S. Burke1, Jud W. Kenworthy1, Shay Viehman1 and Todd Kellison2; 1National Ocean Service, Beaufort, NC USA, 2 National Park Service, Biscayne National Park, FL, USA

Large-scale Remotely Sensed Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Monitoring in Florida Bay and Biscayne Bay: a Progress Report – Paul Carlson1, Kevin Madley1, Jim Burd1, Nate Morton1, Laura Yarbro1, Penny Hall1, April Huffman2 and Patti Sime2; 1Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL, 2South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Monthly Variability in Florida Bay Benthic Foraminifera Community Structure – Charles M. Featherstone1 and Patricia L. Blackwelder2, 3; 1Ocean Chemistry Division, NOAA Atlantic & Oceanographic Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL, USA, 2Marine Geology & Geophysics, RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 3Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center, Dania Beach, FL, USA

Loss and Restoration of Seagrass in South Florida – Adam Gelber1, William F. Precht1, Cheryl Wapnick2 and Donald R. Deis2; 1Ecological Sciences Program, PBS&J, Miami, FL USA, 2Ecological Sciences Program, PBS&J, Jacksonville, FL USA

Marine/Estuarine Site Prioritization Framework for Florida, Implications for Florida Bay – Laura Geselbracht and Roberto Torres; The Nature Conservancy, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA

FHAP South Florida - A New, Improved Fisheries Habitat Assessment Program – Margaret O. Hall1, Michael J. Durako2, Manuel Merello1, Donna Berns1, Keri Ferenc1, Farrah Hall1, Fay Belshe2 and Brooke Landry2; 1 Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL, USA, 2 Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USA

Community Structure in Sediment Bacteria along the Florida Everglades Marsh, Mangrove, and Florida Bay Ecotone: Estimation by PCR-DGGE and Sequence Analyses – Joseph N. Boyer and Makoto Ikenaga; Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Modeling Analysis of Florida Bay’s Seagrass Community Composition: The Importance of Sediment Characteristics, Water Quality, and Salinity – Amanda A. McDonald and Christopher J. Madden; Coastal Ecosystems Division, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA

Examination of Sulfated Phenolic Compounds in the Seagrass Thalassia testudinum Using a Radiotracer Experiment – Jasmine S. Peters; Coastal Plant Ecology Lab, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431

Long Term Evaluation of Sponge Population Recovery Following a Widespread Mortality: Will We Ever Know When Recovery Has Occurred? Is Restoration Necessary? – John Stevely, Donald E. Sweat and Robert Wasno; Florida Sea Grant Extension Program, Palmetto, FL

Characterization of the Nearshore Hard-Bottom Habitat of the Florida Keys – Marie-Agnès Tellier and Rodney Bertelsen; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Marathon, Florida, USA

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Water Quality 

Water Quality and Sediment Chemistry and Toxicity in the Primary Canal System within Southern Miami-Dade County: 1996 versus 2001 – Edward Long1, Parley Winger2, Keith Mayura3, Luis Otero4, Tom Seal5, Stephen Blair4 and Susan Markley4; 1ERL Environmental, Salem, OR, USA, 2U. S. Geological Survey, Athens, GA, USA, 3Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, University of Georgia, Savannah, GA, USA, 4Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management, Miami, FL, USA, 5Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL USA

Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone – Samantha L. Evans1, William T. Anderson1, 2 and Frank J. Jochem3; 1Dept. of Earth Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 2Southeast Environmental Research Center; Dept. of Earth Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 3Marine Biology Program, Florida International University, North Miami, FL, USA

Biogeochemical Relationship between the Everglades and Florida Bay Revealed Through Spatial and Temporal Variability of Nitrogen Isotopic Compositions of Dissolved Nutrients and Biologically-Derived Organic Components – A. M. Hoare1, D. Hollander1, C. Heil2 and P. Glibert3; 1College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL USA, 2Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL USA, 3University of Maryland Center for Environmental Research, Horn Point Laboratory, Cambridge, MD,
USA

Remote Sensing of Water Quality Index and Connectivity in Florida Bay and Florida Keys: Some Recent Advances – Chuanmin Hu1, Frank E. Muller-Karger1, Zhongping Lee2, Elizabeth Johns3 and Jim Hendee3; 1Institute for Marine Remote Sensing, College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, 2Naval Research Lab at Stennis, 3Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA

Sources of Variation in Florida Bay Water Quality – Christopher R. Kelble1,2 and Peter B. Ortner2; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, RSMAS, U. Miami, Miami, Florida, USA, 2Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA, Miami, Florida, USA

Fate of Everglades Dissolved Organic Matter in Florida Bay – Stephen Kelly, David Rudnick, Robin Bennett and Amanda McDonald; South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL

Resuspended Sediments and Effects on Chemotaxonomy in North-Central and western Florida Bay – J. William Louda; Organic Geochemistry Group, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA

Spatial, Geomorphological, and Seasonal Variability of CDOM in the Florida Coastal Everglades. – Rudolf Jaffé1,2, Nagamitsu Maie1,2, Joe Boyer1, Chen-Yong Yang2, Michelle Calvo3 and Oliva Pisani1; 1Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL., USA, 2Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL., USA, 3Department of Biology, Florida International University, Miami, FL., USA

Characterization of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in an Oligotrophic Subtropical Coastal Ecosystem – Characterization of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in an Oligotrophic Subtropical Coastal Ecosystem – Rudolf Jaffé1, Nagamitsu Maie1, Kathleen J. Parish1, Akira Watanabe2, Tomonori Abe2, Heike Knicker3, Ronald Benner4 and Karl Kaiser4; 1Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL., USA, 2Department of Cycling Resources, School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan, 3Lehrstuhl für Bodenkunde, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany, 4Department of Biological Sciences & Marine Science Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA

Estimates of Nutrient Loads at West Highway Creek in Northeastern Florida Bay – W. Barclay Shoemaker, Mark Zucker and Paul Stumpner; U.S. Geological Survey, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA

The National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Water Quality Assessment Program in Florida BayKevin R. T. Whelan, Matt Patterson, Brian Witcher and Andrea Atkinson; National Park Service, Inventory and Monitoring, South Florida / Caribbean Network

Draft Benthic Habitat Classification Map of Florida Bay – Kevin R. T. Whelan, National Park Service, Inventory and Monitoring , South Florida / Caribbean Network , Miami, FL         IMPORTANT NOTE: This display is being presented to solicit
audience review of the map before its completion. The goal is to have researchers with field sites located in the Florida Bay region verify the accuracy of these site classifications as identified on the map.

Monitoring Regional Water Quality from Satellite in Florida Bay, USA – Timothy T. Wynne and Richard.Stumpf; NOAA/National Ocean Service Silver Spring, MD,
USA

Observations on Bottom Albedo in Florida Bay from Multiple Satellites – Timothy T. Wynne and Richard P. Stumpf; NOAA/National Ocean Service, Silver Spring, MD 20910

Spatial Variation of Sediment Characteristics with Respect to Sediment-Water Exchange of Phosphorus in Florida Bay – Jia-Zhong Zhang1, Xiaolan Huang2 and Charles J. Fischer1; 1Ocean Chemistry Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, 2CIMAS, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL

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Physical Processes

Analysis of the Process Physics of Tributaries to Florida Bay Using Artificial Neural Networks and Three-Dimensional Response Surfaces – Paul A. Conrads1 and Edwin A. Roehl2; 1USGS South Carolina Water Science Center, Columbia, SC, USA, 2Advanced Data Mining, LLP, Greenville, SC, USA

Real-time Oceanographic and Meteorological Observations in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary – Elizabeth Johns1, Ryan H. Smith1, Peter B. Ortner1, Thomas N. Lee2, Christopher R. Kelble3, and Nelson Melo3; 1Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USA, 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 3Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA

Salinity Variability in South Florida Coastal Waters, 1995 – 2005 – Elizabeth Johns1, Peter B. Ortner1, Ryan H. Smith1, Thomas N. Lee2, Christopher R. Kelble3, and Nelson Melo3; 1Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USA, 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 3Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, FL,
USA

Salinity Patterns of Florida Bay – Christopher R. Kelble1,2, Elizabeth M. Johns2, Peter B. Ortner2, William K. Nuttle3, Thomas N. Lee4, Clinton D. Hittle5 and Ryan Smith2; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, RSMAS, UM, Miami, Florida, USA, 2Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA, Miami, Florida, USA, 3Eco-hydrology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 4Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, U. Miami, Miami, Florida, USA, 5United States Geological Survey, Miami, Florida, USA

The Status of Statistical Model Development and Implementation for Salinity Performance Measures in Florida Bay and Along the Southwest Gulf Coast – Frank E. Marshall III 1, DeWitt Smith2 and Cheryl Buckingham3; 1Cetacean Logic Foundation, Inc. and Environmental Consulting & Technology, Inc., New Smyrna Beach, FL USA, 2Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL USA, 3US Army Corps of Engineers DP-A, Jacksonville, FL USA

Recent Measurements of Salinity, Flow and Sea Level Variability in Western Basins of Florida Bay – Rabbit and Twin Key Basins – Nelson Melo1, Thomas N. Lee2, Ned Smith3, Elizabeth Johns4, Ryan Smith4, Peter Ortner4 and DeWitt Smith5; 1Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 3Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Ft Pierce, FL, USA, 4NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL, USA, 5Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL, USA

Flow Exchanges through Culverts along Everglades National Park Road – Raymond W. Schaffranek1, Marc A. Stewart2, Ami L. Riscassi1 and Daniel J. Nowacki1; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA, 2U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR,
USA

Coastal Ocean Observing Systems: How SEACOOS and GCOOS are Facilitating Marine Systems Science in Florida – Christina Simoniello and Michael Spranger; Sea Grant Extension Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

The Influence of Hurricane Katrina on Water Quality in Florida Bay and Surrounding Coastal Waters – Ryan H. Smith1, Elizabeth Johns1, Shailer R. Cummings1, Peter B.Ortner1, Christopher Kelble2, Nelson Melo2 and Thomas N. Lee3; 1NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL, USA, 2Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 3Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA

Satellite-Tracked Surface Drifter Trajectories Reveal the Spatial and Temporal Current Variability of South Florida Coastal Waters – Ryan H. Smith1, Elizabeth Johns1, Peter B.Ortner1, Thomas N. Lee2, Christopher Kelble3 and Nelson Melo3; 1NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL, USA, 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 3Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, U. of Miami, Miami, FL, USA

Temporal Changes in the Delivery of Freshwater to Florida Bay: A Decade of Change – Peter K. Swart1 and Rene Price2; 1Marine Geology and Geophysics, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, FL, 2Department of Geology, Florida International University, Miami FL

A Bay-Estuarine Model to Simulate Hydrodynamics and Thermal, Salinity, Sediment, and Water Quality Transport in 3-Dimensions (BEST3D) – Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh1, Fan Zhang2, Tien-Shuenn Wu3 and Gordon Hu4; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Central Florida, FL, USA, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL, USA, South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA

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Higher Trophic Levels

Fish Density, Diversity, and Composition of Fish Communities in Florida Bay: Results from Fisheries Independent Surveys – Alejandro Acosta; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; Fish Wildlife Research Institute; South Florida Regional Lab, Marathon, FL, USA

A Pathogenic Viral Disease Infecting Juvenile Spiny Lobster in the Florida Keys – Mark Butler1, Donald Behringer1 and Jeffery Shields2; 1Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, 2Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA

Comparison of Gear for Sampling Epibenthic Communities in Biscayne Bay – Joan A. Browder1, Michael B. Robblee2, Jeremy Hall3, David Reed2, Destiny Smith3 and Andre Daniels2; 1NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL, USA, 2United States Geological Survey, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA, 3Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Fl, USA

Growth and Mortality Estimates to Support a Pink Shrimp Growth and Survival Model – Joan A. Browder1, Darlene R. Johnson2 and Michael. B. Robblee3; 1NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL, 2Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA, 3United States Geological Survey, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Miami, FL, USA

Attributes of Florida Bay Contributing to High Mercury Concentrations in Fish – David W. Evans; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Coastal and Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, NC, USA

Observations of Distribution and Abundance of Fishes Inhabiting Shallow, Near Shore Seagrass Beds in the Middle Florida Keys – Karole L. Ferguson and Claudine T. Bartels; Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, South Florida Regional Lab, Marathon, FL, USA

“Can’t Get There from Here”: Hydrological Connectivity Impacts Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Fish Community Structure – David P. J. Green1,2, Joel C. Trexler1, Thomas E. Philippi1, Jerome J. Lorenz2 and Carole C. McIvor3; 1Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 2Tavernier Science Center, Audubon of Florida, Tavernier, FL, USA, 3Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies, USGS, ST. Petersburg, FL, USA

Statistical Models of Florida Bay Fish and Shrimp for Minimum Flows and Levels Evaluation – Darlene R. Johnson1, Joan A. Browder1 and Michael. B. Robblee2; 1NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL, USA, 2United States Geological Survey, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Miami, FL, USA

Variation in Otolith Microchemistry among Four Species of Juvenile Snappers – David L. Jones1, Monica R. Lara1 and John T. Lamkin2; 1Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami—RSMAS, Miami, FL, USA, 2NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL, USA

Sponge Feeding Selectivity across Seasons and Species in Florida Bay – Anne Kathryn Kauffman, Mark J. Butler IV and Andrew S. Gordon; Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA

Experiments on Florida Bay Biota – James B. Murray; U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA

Long-Term Patterns in Fish Community Structure in Johnson Key Basin, Western Florida Bay – Michael B. Robblee1, Patricia L. Mumford2 and André Daniels1; 1USGS, Center for Water and Restoration Studies, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA, 2Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL,
USA

Elasmobranchs of Everglades National Park – Tonya R. Wiley and Colin A. Simpfendorfer; Mote Marine Laboratory, Center for Shark Research, Sarasota, FL,
USA

The Importance of South Florida Ecosystems to Smalltooth Sawfish (Pristis pectinata) – Colin A. Simpfendorfer and Tonya R. Wiley; Mote Marine Laboratory, Center for Shark Research, Sarasota, FL, USA  

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Adjacent Systems

Florida Keys Tidal Restoration Pre-Construction Monitoring – Michelle L. Braynard1, John H. Hunt1, Kevin Madley1 and Kenneth Espy2; 1Fish & Wildlife Research Institute, Marathon and St. Petersburg, FL, 2Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL

Observations of Unsteady Internal Motions on a Fringing Coral Reef – Kristen A. Davis1, Stephen G. Monismith1, James J. Leichter2 and James L. Hench1; 1Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA, 2Integrative Oceanography Division, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, San Diego, CA, USA

Optimization of Water Quality Monitoring in Biscayne Bay, Florida – Carlton D. Hunt1, Steve, Rust2, Jennifer Field3 and Fred Todt2; 1Battelle Applied Coastal & Environmental Services, Duxbury MA, 2Battelle Measurement & Data Analysis Sciences, Columbus, OH, 3Battelle Applied Coastal & Environmental Services, West Palm Beach, FL

Uses and Economic Contribution of Biscayne Bay, Florida – Grace M. Johns1 and Trisha Stone2; 1Hazen and Sawyer, P.C., Hollywood, FL, 2South Florida Water Management District

Post Hurricane Katrina Surface-Water Monitoring in Biscayne Bay, Card Sound, Barnes Sound, and Miami-Dade Watersheds – Steve Blair, Susan Kemp, Forrest Shaw and Susan Markley; Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management, Miami, FL, USA

Hurricane Impacts on Salinity, Water-Level, and Temperature in Biscayne Bay, Florida – Helen M. Mayoral, Amy D. Renshaw, Adam D. Wood, and Sarah A. Bellmund; Biscayne National Park

Coral Reef Rapid Assessment and Monitoring in the Florida Keys: 1998 - 2005 – Steven Miller1, Mark Chiappone1, Dione Swanson2, Leanne Rutten-Miller1 and Burton Shank3; 1Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina – Wilmington,, 2Rosensteil School of Atmospheric and Marine Sciences, University of Miami, 3Boston University Marine Program

Mapping Vegetation in the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands – Patrick A. Pitts and Les Vilchek; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Vero Beach, Florida, USA

Using Natural Geochemical Tracers to Discern the Dominant Sources of Freshwater into Biscayne Bay, Southeast Florida – Jeremy C. Stalker1, René M. Price1, Peter K. Swart2; 1Dept of Earth Sciences and SERC, Florida International University, 2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, MGG, University of Miami

Diatom Records of Environmental Changes in Biscayne Bay Sediments. – Anna Wachnicka1,2 and Evelyn Gaiser1,3; 1Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 2Department of Earth Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, 3Department of Biology, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Regression Analysis of Salinity in Caloosahatchee Estuary – Chenxia Qiu1 and Kevin Y. Zhu2; 1South Florida Water Management District, West Palm Beach, FL, USA, 2BEM Systems Inc., West Palm Beach, FL, USA  

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Registration Information

What Does the Registration Fee Include?
The registration fee, combined with funds contributed by our generous sponsors, includes conference materials, an abstract book, a Welcome Social on Sunday, a Poster Session Reception on Monday and a Poolside Reception on Tuesday. Early morning, mid-morning and afternoon refreshment breaks will also be provided each day. The Accompanying Person registration fee includes the three evening networking functions only, and is not for use by co-workers.

NOTE TO STUDENTS: A photocopy of a valid student ID must accompany student registration forms. After registering online, please FAX a copy of your student ID to: 1-352-392-9734 ATTN: Florida Bay.

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PLEASE NOTE: The Accompanying Person registration fee includes the welcome reception and the poster session reception only. The Guest Registration Category is not for use by co-workers.

Before clicking on the Register Now link below, we recommend that you have payment information on-hand, such as credit card, check number or purchase order number, if we are to invoice your institution.

Refund Policy: Requests for registration refunds will be honored if a written notification of cancellation is received by the Office of Conferences & Institutes on or before November 11, 2005. A $100.00 processing fee will be deducted from all registration refunds. Sorry, no refunds will be honored for cancellations after November 11, 2005.

Special Needs: Participants with special needs can be reasonably accommodated by contacting the Office of Conferences & Institutes at least 10 working days prior to the conference. We can be reached by phone at 1-352-392-5930, by fax at 1-352-392-9734, or by calling 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The TDD number can only be accessed from within Florida.

Advanced registration is closed, however, we will be happy to register you onsite at the conference and look forward to your participation.

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Hotel Accommodations

Hawk's Cay Resort - The Heart of the Florida Keys

61 Hawk's Cay Boulevard l Duck Key, Florida 33050
Reservations: 800-432-2242 (U.S. & Canada) or 954-252-5200
Resort Telephone: 305-743-7000
Resort Fax: 305-743-5215
Email: reservations@hawkscay.com
Web Site: http://www.hawkscay.com/

The Keys — a 156-mile long chain of islands — extend like stepping-stones from the tip of Florida’s mainland to Key West, the southernmost city in the United States. Nestled amongst this tropical paradise of rare birds, majestic palms and a magnificent coral reef is Hawk’s Cay Resort - 90 miles south of Miami between Islamorada and Marathon in the heart of the Florida Keys, only 8 miles from Marathon Airport. Situated on 60 acres, Hawk’s Cay is a picture perfect island experience you'll never forget. An elegant hotel with a Caribbean flair, the resort offers a 177-room inn and 295 charming villas reminiscent of days gone by. Featuring a waterfront conference center, a marina, award-winning restaurants and saltwater lagoon, at Hawk's Cay on Duck Key, things just feel good. And so will you.

The Hawk’s Cay Resort is offering two types of beautifully appointed guest room accommodations for our group: regular hotel guest rooms and two-bedroom conch villas. Conference participants will primarily be housed in guest room buildings located closest to the main conference center where our meetings and poster sessions will be held.

Hotel Information Index

 

HOTEL GUEST ROOMS ($129/149 a night)

The resort’s regular hotel guestrooms feature 420 sq. ft. of spacious accommodations with separate bath and vanity areas, balcony porches, small refrigerators and coffee makers. These rooms are available at the group rate of $129 a night with one person in a room, and $149 a night with two people in a room. A $20 charge applies for each additional occupant.

TWO BEDROOM CONCH VILLAS ($230/250 a night)

A very limited number of Conch Villas are available if you are traveling with multiple colleagues from your organization and wish to share accommodations. Individually furnished and decorated, the two bedroom, two bath Conch Villas offer 950 sq. ft. and sleeping space for up to five. Amenities include a full kitchen, washer/dryer, living room, and water view porch with an optional spa upon request. Conch Villas with balcony spas are based on availability and are located farthest from the conference center. Housekeeping service is provided after each 3rd night of stay. ADA compliant villas are available on request. Conch Villas are available at a special group rate of $230 a night with one person in a room, and $250 a night with two people in a room. A $20 charge applies for each additional occupant with a maximum of five occupants per villa. If you wish to book a Conch Villa, we encourage you to make your hotel reservation as soon as possible.

ADDITIONAL GUEST ROOM RATE INFORMATION

The room rate for both a regular guest room ($129-single/149-double) or a Conch Villa ($230-single/$250-double) includes a daily complimentary lunch for each paid occupant. A $20 charge applies for each additional guest in the room above the first two paid occupants. So when making your hotel reservation, be sure to specify the total number of individuals who will occupy your guest room. At check-in, each paid guest will be provided with a lunch ticket equal to the number of nights of their stay. If you will be commuting to the conference and will not be staying in the host hotel, lunch tickets can be purchased from the hostess each day.

The Hawk’s Cay nightly resort fee of $10 per guest room or $20 per villa is also incorporated in the guest room rates quoted above. The resort fee includes: parking, unlimited tennis court time (reservations required in advance), daily access to the fitness center, daily access to the boat ramp, coffee daily in all accommodations, complimentary use of all pools, the lagoon and chaise lounge chairs and towels, complimentary local and toll free calls up to 15 minutes and a daily newspaper. NOTE: All room rates are quoted exclusive of applicable state and local taxes, currently 11.5%. (To receive tax exempt status, payment must be made in the form of a government issued check, credit card or purchase order, and, be accompanied by a Florida sales tax exemption certificate presented at check-in.)

TO MAKE RESERVATIONS:

To make a hotel reservation, contact the reservations department at 954-252-5200, or on their toll free reservations line at 800-432-2242 (U.S. & Canada), or call them directly on the Resort Telephone at 305-743-7000. Be sure to specify you are attending the Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Conference.

The group rate will be honored two days prior and two days following the conference, based on availability. The deadline to make your reservation and still receive the discounted group rate is November 1, 2005. After this date, guestrooms and the group rate may no longer be available. As this is a discounted group rate, it is not commissonable to travel agents and Frequent Traveler Points do not apply. 

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Travel & Area Information

 

Florida
Keys - By Air

Home
Miami International Airport

The Florida Keys and Key West
Title/Logo

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Other Sites of Interest

 

Pedometrics 2005
Frontiers in Pedometrics

 

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Organizing Committee

  • Program Management Committee (PMC)

  • Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems
    Science Program

  • Florida Sea Grant College Program

  • University of Florida/IFAS
    Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)

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Questions / Contacts


John Hunt
Conference Organizer
Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission
Florida Marine Research Institute
Suite 119
2796 Overseas Highway
Marathon, FL 33050
PHONE: 305-289-2330 / SUNCOM: 464-2330
FAX: 305-289-2334 / SUNCOM: 464-2334
EMAIL: john.hunt@myfwc.com
WEB SITE: research.myfwc.com

Beth Miller-Tipton

Conference Coordinator

University of Florida/IFAS
Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)
Building 639, Mowry Road
PO Box 110750
Gainesville, FL 32611-0750
PHONE: 352-392-5930
FAX: 352-392-9734
EMAIL: bmt@ufl.edu
WEB SITE: www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu

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